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All Articles For Trying The Spirits

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We not only believe that God foreknows all things, but that He does not and cannot foreknow without foreordaining. For not only is God’s omniscience all-comprehensive and all embracing, but so is His foreordination. He foreordains whatsoever comes to pass (Acts 4:27f). Therefore it is impossible that He know beforehand anything that has not been already foreordained. There is nothing that can be the object of divine prescience but that which has been preordained.

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It has always been so, yet our day is still one in which nations and kingdoms are overturned and uprooted. Germany we have seen fall twice in a generation. Then besides France, Italy, Spain, Japan and Poland, we have seen the fall of numerous European countries, many under the Red yoke. With the end of the colonial age, we have seen before our eyes kingdoms become extinct, while nations now are dying away, in many ways, it seems, our own among them. Everywhere there are public rebellions, strikes, revolutions, tumults, civil disobedience and anarchy.

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Modernist religion has no place for the exaltation of Christ. A well known advocate of religious liberals and modernist “theology” was Professor George Burman Foster, of the University of Chicago, who later in life was pastor of a Unitarian church. In the preface to a certain volume he openly denied every one of the Christian fundamentals of the faith. On the exaltation of Christ he said, “According to orthodoxy, the Son of God laid aside his divine glory and then took it up again. He alienated from himself certain divine qualities, and then integrated them again.

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Originally, Unitarianism was not a movement independent of the Christian churches, nor strictly, a schismatic group, but an intra-church movement apostatizing from Christ, His church and the confessions. Its purpose was not to form another denomination, but to gain control of the churches in the ecclesiastical association. The Calvinist members, rather, had to relinquish their church properties and withdraw. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in buildings, furnishings and funds fell to the Unitarians as a result of litigation.

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The term Agnosticism, probably invented by T. Huxley (1869), is used to express the philosophy that no knowledge of absolute reality is possible. It holds that man can not have any real, valid knowledge, but can know only phenomena (Kant), or only impressions (Hume). Certain half-agnostics, denying theoretically all objective truth did nevertheless practically speak of a rough approximation to what we might loosely and colloquially call “truth” under some such designation as “value judgments” (Ritschl).

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Billy Graham is, undeniably, a prominent revivalist. That is not the same as saying he is an eminent preacher. Strictly, a preacher represents a true church, is called and sent by such a church, and labors both out from and with a view to the church. Billy Graham does not necessarily do any of these things. Nevertheless, he is prominent, we do not say eminent, as a public figure. To be prominent means to be conspicuous in position, character or importance. Graham is so in all these respects. But “eminent” is a richer term.

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The writer in early childhood spent many a summer on the East coast at the seashore of Atlantic City, N.J., where daytimes were spent on the beach, bathing in the surf, reveling in glorious sunshine and embibing the delicious, invigorating salt air. Evenings, when in our teens, we were permitted to “walk the boardwalk” alone, visiting the auctions, the gadget demonstrations, and, among the many other intriguing sights, the free lectures. It was at the latter dubious place we were first introduced to astrology.

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The constructive and warrantable critics of Billy Graham, the “one-world” evangelist, are on the increase as multitudes of people are being alerted both as to the wrong doctrine, as well as to the shockingly unscriptural methods of the man. It has been his policy in the past not to pay any attention to his critics, to ignore giving them any answer. He has announced over his radio broadcast that he can neither burden nor side-track himself with answers to critics. His own words were, “I never answer my critics.”(1) Yet Dr. John R.

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