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(Connection: In the preceding section we saw Gomarus, accompanied by several of his fellow ministers, debating against Arminius, accompanied by several of his fellows. The subject was the various points of doctrine about which they disagreed. The conference was held in the presence of the States. At the conclusion of the conference, the States promised to convene a Provincial Synod; but to this promise conditions were attached with which the Reformed ministers could not comply. They also ordered both parties to submit their views in writing.

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(Connection: In the previous installment we learned: 1) That the Remonstrants were pushing for the appointment of Vorstius as the replacement for Arminius at Leiden. 2) That the Remonstrants gained a certain legal standing for their Five Points, so that candidates for the ministry could not be questioned about these. 3) That in this process the document called the Remonstrance finally came into the possession of the Reformed party. 4) That all of this led to the Conference at the Hague in 1611.

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(In this paragraph which is continued in this article and in the preceding paragraph Kuyper has begun a discussion of reformation by means of a break with the church. He has only introduced this subject, but has emphasized in the preceding material, that such reformation must be: 1) a work of God; 2) a work that begins in the consciousness of sin and guilt which arises in the heart of the believer.) 

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Connection: In the preceding section we saw: 1) That Conrad Vorstius, the Socinian nominee to replace Arminius at Leiden, returned to the Netherlands. 2) That King James I, of Great Britain, strongly warned against Vorstius. 3) That the Curators of the Academy were ordered not to proceed with the call of Vorstius. 4) That the Hague Conference resulted in no solution to the problems in the churches.) 

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(Connection: In the last installment we saw the conflict become more intense. In some parts of the country actual separation began to take place, and even the formation of so-called “nood-gemeenten” (emergency congregations). Meanwhile, Simon Episcopius, on advice of the Remonstrants, was called to the Academy of Leiden. Again pleas were made to the States-General to authorize a National Synod; but this was prevented through the influence of. the Remonstrants. The latter continued to make open and shameful propaganda, to the grief and injury of the churches.) 

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(In the previous installment we learned about another conference, urged by WiIlem Lodewijk, Count of Nassau and Governor of Friesland, between three representatives of the Remonstrants, led by Johannes Uitenbogaard, and three representatives of the Reformed, led by Festus Hommius. The Remonstrants sought toleration for their views—no strings attached. The Reformed sought a limited toleration pending the convening of a National Synod. The conference was held at Delft, but it was fruitless.

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(Connection: In the previous section we saw that the Remonstrant party continued its underhanded maneuverings to gain “toleration” for itself. However, in several cities the Contra-Remonstrants had the support of the civil authorities in continuing to insist that the differences in the churches had to be resolved by synodical decision. Among these were Amsterdam, Dordrecht, Enkhuizen, Edam, and Purmerend.) 

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