All Articles For Taking Heed to the Doctrine

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Previous article in this series: January 1, 2014, p. 151. Introduction Scripture is “the oracles of God.” This is the apostle Paul’s description of Scripture in Romans 3:2. What this means is that Scripture is the Word of God. Scripture is not the word of man and the Word of God. Scripture is rather the Word of God and the Word of God alone. As the oracles of God, Scripture is infallible, inerrant, and authoritative over the individual believer and over the church as a whole. That Scripture is the oracles of God has important im­plication for translations of Scripture....

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Previous article in this series: November 15, 2013, p. 80. “Though the Stake Were Staring Us in the Face” A papal legate arrived in the city [of Prague], in the spring of 1412. He brought the sacred pallium—a vestment sent by the pope as a token of authority—to Archbishop Albik, the successor of Zbynek. He was also, to publish the bull of the pope against Ladislas. He suspected that Hus might oppose the measure. Yet it was highly important for the success of the sale of indulgences, the practical plan to raise funds for the crusade, that the great preacher...

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Previous article in this series: August 2013, p. 444. A previous article (April 15, 2013, p. 320) spoke of how today many are redefining the term redemption. The redemption of which they speak is very different from the redemption spoken of in Scripture: –  They speak of a “redemption” for this world, rather than for the church. –  This redemption would involve not a deliverance from sin, but rather some external changes in society designed to improve merely the bodily life of human beings. –  Individuals of different religious faiths could join hands as “redeemers,” working together to bring this...

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Previous article in this series: December 1, 2012, p. 104. The Bible is the infallibly inspired written Word of God. This is the believer’s heartfelt convic­tion and bold confession concerning Scripture. Simply put, the Bible is the Word of God, the Word of God in the words of men. Because it is the Word of God, the Bible is the supreme authority in the life of the believer. Only God has supreme and ultimate authority. Because the Bible is the Word of God, it has supreme and ultimate authority over the church and over the members of the church. It...

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Previous article in this series: June 2013, p. 402. Before our Lord ascended into heaven, He gave us a mandate. He called us to go forth and make all nations disciples of Christ, teaching them to observe everything that Christ has taught us. Constantly we are to be doing this. Centrally on Sunday by means of the official proclamation of the gospel, but also throughout the week, we are to be busily engaged in this work that our Lord has given us. Together we are to seek to learn all that Christ has taught us, applying it to our own...

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Many love to speak about “culture” today. Christian education, supposedly, is de­signed to teach our children to engage in “cultural activities” that will make this world a better place. But what exactly is culture? What is accomplished by the various “cultural activities” promoted in neo-Calvinistic colleges today? More importantly, what activity would be the biblical counterpart to the world’s idea of developing culture? What is “culture”? A cultural activity is one that is designed to develop human beings, especially by means of education. It refers to the act of “cultivating” people to promote their growth. Just as agriculture has to...

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Redemption has been redefined by many. The true gospel is about the redemption of the church, but many today proclaim a redemp­tion of this world. Not surprisingly, this shift from the redemption of the church to the redemption of this world would involve a change in what is meant by the term redemp­tion. Therefore it is of utmost importance that we know what Scripture means by this term, and how it is being used very differently today by many who claim to be giving instruction in the truth of the Reformed faith. The redemption provided by Christ To redeem is...

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Previous article in this series: October 1, 2012, p. 8.   Christianity is a revealed religion. Christians are “people of the Book.” The believer, accord­ing to the Heidelberg Catechism, the 21st A, “hold[s] for truth all that God has revealed to us in His Word.” The child of God does not question, much less raise objections to or deny the accuracy of the Bible. Rather, he holds for truth—objective truth—all that God has revealed in His Word. He holds for truth all that God has revealed in the Bible. He does not distinguish in the Bible between that which is...

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Previous article in this series: August 2012, p. 451.   Deus dixit! God has spoken! This is the pos­sibility of the knowledge of God. We know God only through His revelation to us. Apart from revelation there is no possibility of the knowledge of God. Apart from revelation God remains essentially unknowable. This is the necessity, the absolute necessity, of revelation. This we saw last time. We also saw that God reveals Himself, desires to reveal Himself, and delights in making Himself known because He is the covenant God. Why has God spoken? Why has God chosen to reveal Himself,...

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Previous article in this series: June 2012, p. 398. Since these articles have appeared over a number of months, I will summarize what has been said thus far. Those who teach the relatively new “Reformational” theology¹ speak of a “Word of God” not found in the Scriptures. Denying that Scripture fully reveals to us the will of God, they say we must turn to the creation to discover many of the details concerning what God’s will is. Yet when they speak of the “creation” they are refer­ring to more than the animals, plants, and inanimate matter. Man is included in...

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