All Articles For Studies in Isaiah

Results 11 to 20 of 41

1. Incompetency. “And I will give boys (as) their princes, and infants shall be ruling over them” (v. 4, Hebrew). Not merely inferior kings would rule over them, but without a king, inept rulers, incapable of “Solomonian” quality, would be of a more “Rehoboamian” hotheaded, reckless despotism. The mere shadow of a king, a boy, would rule, whose advisers would be mental and moral weaklings, the impudent, the imprudent, the effeminate, the cowardly!

Continue reading

“And lambs graze as (in) their pastures and deserts (where the flocks got) fat will sojourners (nomad shepherds) consume” (v. 17, Heb.). 1. Here the second woe ends, the longest of them all. The literal fulfillment of this we see today where modern Jerusalem, about thirty-five feet above the ancient Jerusalem, is a Mohammedan city, and much of Palestine is pasture land for Arab shepherds. Sheep graze over the ruins of Jerusalem as their pasture. (Once Jehovah’s vineyard, now a pasture!) These sheep are God’s people from among the Gentiles.

Continue reading

1. Why Government Office is Refused. “For Jerusalem is failed and Judah fallen, because their tongue and their deeds (are) against Jehovah, to embitter (insult) the eyes of His glory,” (v. 8, Heb.). “For, ” expressing “the reason why the conscripted man refuses to accept the reins of public office” (E.J. Young). For the ruin (v. 3) of any nation, generally, it has only itself to thank, and that because of its profane and blasphemous offending of the holiness and glory of God. There is no exception with the nation whose God is the Lord.

Continue reading

I.THE CONFOUNDING OF AHAZ (vv. 1-2). 1. In a dangerous plot against Jerusalem (1). A conspiracy arose against the kingdom of Judah. Two monarchs were in league plotting Judah’s destruction. Ahaz the king was in trouble. But in a strategic place he is met by Isaiah the prophet with a message of assurance that the threatened invasion would not succeed, for God would destroy both enemy nations (1-9). 

Continue reading