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Previous article in this series: December 1, 2014, p. 106. There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, and it is common among men: A man to whom God hath given riches, wealth, and honour, so that he wanteth nothing for his soul of all that he desireth, yet God giveth him not power to eat thereof, but a stranger eateth it: this is vanity, and it is an evil disease. Ecclesiastes 6:1, 2 “There is an evil which I have seen under the sun…” (Eccl. 6:1a). The Word of God introduces a new observation of what...

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2014, p. 465. Behold that which I have seen: it is good and comely for one to eat and to drink, and to enjoy the good of all his labour that he taketh under the sun all the days of his life, which God giveth him: for it is his portion. Every man also to whom God hath given riches and wealth, and hath given him power to eat thereof, and to take his portion, and to rejoice in his labour; this is the gift of God. For he shall not much remember...

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2014, p. 465. In the preceding verse, the text concluded, “…the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep” (Eccl. 5:12). Riches, for a man given to covetousness, bring with them fretful care and worry lest they be lost. In verses 13-17, the Preacher turns to this reality of loss by again describing what is seen under the sun in the life of men. What is seen is a sore or grievous evil, a spiritual sickness. “There is a sore evil which I have seen under the sun, namely, riches kept...

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In our last study (Standard Bearer, March 15, 1997) we fo­cused on how Jesus demon­strated His being the light of the world in the healing of the man born blind. This time our study turns es­pecially to the various reactions to this light-shining miracle. And what do we see first of all? Religious Rapscallions! Some (the neighbors, v.8?) brought the man healed of his blindness to a group of Pharisees. These religious “elite” of the Jews, understanding that this miracle which Jesus had performed might gain for Him more disciples, seek at all costs to discredit Him and this notable...

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Previous article in this series: September 15, 2012, p. 493. Ecclesiastes 5:1-7 The Word of God in Ecclesiastes 5 turns from considering the general vanity of men to their worship of God, for in that worship of God the folly of sin also manifests itself. Before describing that folly, the text turns to an exhortation, “Keep thy foot when thou goest to the house of God” (Eccl. 5:1). God’s house, the temple, was the visible manifestation of God’s presence with His people, His covenant dwelling place. It is today the gathering of the body of Christ, the church, which is...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2014, p. 186. You will remember our reference last time to Cal­vin’s observation that “there was a difference be­tween the Law and Gospel, as if there were a veil between them so that they might not see more closely the things that are now revealed to our eyes.” Luke 9:45 says the same concerning the disciples’ failure to grasp Jesus’ instruction about His impending death: “But they understood not this saying, and it was hid from them, that they perceived it not.” A “veil.” A veil that “hides.” Not a difficult concept, surely,...

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Previous article in this series: December 15, 2013, p. 139. “Lord, wilt thou at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” That was the question of the Eleven with which we concluded our previous article in this series. We might, on first thought, be surprised by that ques­tion. After all, had not Christ “breathed on them” and said to them “Receive ye the Holy Ghost” (John 20:22)? Had He not “opened their understanding” that they might “understand the scriptures” (Luke 24:45)? And had He not “expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself” (Luke 24:27)? In light...

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Previous article in this series: October 15, 2013, p. 39. Rev. Ophoff—so we noted last time—took vigor­ous exception to Fairbairn’s view that the expiatory sacrifice “had a meaning of its own” (that is, apart from its significance as a type), which meaning the ancient worshiper could comprehend and therefore, through it, offer acceptable service to God “whether he might perceive or not the further respect it had to a dy­ing Savior.” Ophoff insisted that, in order for a sacrifice to be pleasing to God, it had to be offered out of faith in Christ. Ophoff went on, however, to acknowledge...

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2013, p. 472. Previous article in this short series was concluded with a question: “The saints of old did have prophetic types, and they were not without the prophetic word, but can it be demonstrated that they linked them?” The prophetic type under consideration was the expia­tory sacrifice, which taught the believer that sin, his sin, must somehow be atoned for. Burdened with the crush­ing weight of his sin, the believer turned to the sacrifice for relief—and found none…until he looked beyond the sacrifice to Jehovah. Jehovah and blood. “These two,” wrote Ophoff,...

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