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Saving faith, however, is also hearty confidence. The Catechism teaches us that true faith is not only a certain knowledge, “but also an assured confidence, which the Holy Ghost works by the gospel in my heart; that not only to others, but to me also remission of sin, everlasting righteousness mid salvation, are freely given by God, merely of grace, only for the sake of Christ’s merits.” After the emphasis we placed upon the knowledge of faith as a spiritual apprehension of the God of our salvation In Christ, and of all the spiritual blessings in Him, It would seem...

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At the close of the important seventh Lord’s Day the Catechism introduces the object or contents of the Christian’s faith, which then, in subsequent chapters it expounds in detail. In Question and Answer 22 it briefly defines that which “is necessary for a Christian to believe” as “All things promised us in the gospel, which the articles of our catholic undoubted Christian faith briefly teach us.” And in answer to Question 23 it quotes the so-called Apostles’ Creed. It draws our attention that the Catechism defines the object of saving faith, not as “the Word of God,” nor as “all...

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Q. 24. How are these articles divided? A. Into three parts; the first is of God the Father, and our creation; the second of God the Son and our redemption; the third of God the Holy Ghost, and our sanctification. Q. 25. Since there is but one divine essence, why speakest thou of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost? A. Because God hath so revealed himself in his word, that these three distinct persons are the one only true and eternal God. In Lord’s Days eight to twenty two inclusive we are really dealing with two symbols or creeds: the Apos­tolic...

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Very sober and brief is the Heidelberg Catechism on the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. Strictly speaking, it expresses all it has to say on this important subject in one question and answer, the twenty fifth: “Since there is but one only divine essence, why speakest thou of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost? Because God has so revealed himself in his word, that these three distinct persons are the one only true and eternal God.” But although very brief, the answer may be considered quite complete. It reminds us that we can speak of the trinity only “because God has...

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The Catechism emphasizes that the doctrine of the. holy trinity is known only from revelation. The Church and the individual believer speak of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, as three persons in the divine essence, only “because God hath so revealed himself, in his word, that these three distinct persons are the one only true and eternal God.” This does not mean that the doctrine of the trinity as such, as a dogma, can be found in the Bible. The Scriptures do not speak of the trinity, of three persons in one essence, nor explain the relation of the three persons...

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Q. 26. What believest thou when thou sayest, “I believe in God the Father, Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth?” A. That the eternal Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who of nothing made heaven and earth, with all that is in them; who like wise upholds and governs the same by his eternal counsel and providence, is for the sake of Christ his Son, my God and my Father; on whom I rely so entirely, that I have no doubt, but he will provide me with all things necessary for soul and body: and further, that he will make...

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Even though passages like Ps. 2:7 cannot be directly quoted to prove the doctrine of the eternal Fatherhood of the first person of the Holy Trinity, and of eternal generation; and even though they refer also to David, and to the resurrection of Christ, yet there can be no doubt about the fact that in last analysis they do speak of that eternal Fatherhood. The Church is not in error when she quotes these words as proof of the eternal generation of the Son. The fatherhood of God with relation to the “holy child Jesus” has its root and basis...

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Very properly and beautifully the Heidelberg Catechism, speaking of God’s fatherhood with respect to all things, as the Creator of heaven and earth, mentions God’s eternal counsel. It is true that, it introduces this counsel here, strictly speaking, not in connection with creation, but as the power whereby God still upholds and governs all things; but this necessarily implies that the same universe that is thus upheld by God’s counsel was also created according to and by the same eternal decree. And let it be understood from the very outset that it is of utmost importance to speak of this...

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Chapter 3: The Eternal Father Creator (continued) This same truth, that in God’s eternal good pleasure Christ is first and all other things are conceived in Him and unto Him, is also taught in other passages of Holy Writ. We have in mind especially that glorious and profound part of the epistle to the Colossians that expresses the theme of the whole letter: “Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones or...

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The word providence is not a very accurate term to express what it is meant to denote. From the term itself the idea cannot be deduced. In the sense in which it is used in this connection it does not occur in Scripture at all. Literally, according to its derivation, the word means foresight. And it has acquired the added meaning, which it now commonly has, of fulfilling a need, of making provision beforehand. We see that winter is coming, and we provide for it by filling our coal bin. So one provides for the needs of his family, a...

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