...

All Articles For Guest Article

Results 91 to 100 of 258

Prof. Hanko is professor of Church History and New Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. January 17, 1990 Dear fellow saints, The Contact Committee had decided to prepare a brief report of our labors in the past few months. We have three or four important matters to bring to your attention. The Committee has been busy helping the saints of the Covenant Reformed Fellowship in Larne, Northern Ireland. At the instructions of the Synod of 1989, the committee. requested the consistory of Norristown, PA to release its pastor to work in Larne, which they graciously consented to do. Rev. K....

Continue reading

Rev. Miersma is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The problem with the various Reformed denominations today including our own, according to many, particularly if you talk occasionally with those who go by the name “Reformed” or “Presbyterian” outside of our churches, is a kind of stuffy, dead orthodoxy. We are supposed to be afflicted with a kind of moldy, old-fashioned conservatism or traditionalism, which is stifling, and which kills the life of the church and all enthusiasm or zeal. This is usually further equated with a quenching of the life of the Spirit and an...

Continue reading

Steven R. Houck is a missionary of the Protestant Reformed Churches in Modesto, California. Prayer is a very important part of the Christian life. Every Christian is to be a praying Christian. The apostle Paul exhorts us, “Pray without ceasing” (I Thess. 5:17). It is the calling of every Christian to take care that he does not neglect to pray. But the Christian must also take care that he prays proper prayers. If our prayers are not proper prayers, we pray in vain. Our prayers are meaningless. In this regard, there is one very important aspect of proper prayer which...

Continue reading

Steven R. Houck is a missionary of the Protestant Reformed Churches in Modesto, California. Every true believer is eager to present the truth of the gospel to those who are around about him. He believes and loves God’s truth. In that truth He sees the glory and majesty of God. He sees the greatness of wonders and the beauty of God’s sovereign grace. Therefore, he wants to tell others of the wondrous truth of the gospel. He wants to see His God glorified through the declaration of God’s truth. With this desire, however, there comes a problem. We do not...

Continue reading

Mr. Doezema is a member of the First Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan and secretary of the Domestic Mission Committee. The work of the Domestic Mission Committee, like that of most other Synodical Committees, is not highly visible. Not that it cannot be, or should not be. It just isn’t. And that’s too bad. Maybe we should have, in The SB, short quarterly reports from the secretaries of the major committees. Then one wouldn’t have to wait for the agenda for Synod in order to learn about what’s happening in the British Isles, or in Tasmania, or in...

Continue reading

Robert C. Harbach is a minister emeritus in the Protestant Reformed Churches. At the institution of the Lord’s Supper, Jesus had spoken these words, “For this is My blood of the new testament which is shed for many, for the remission of sins” (Matt. 26:28). He could speak of His blood as already shed, for He is the foreordained “Lamb slain before the foundation of the world.” John the Baptist did too, introducing Jesus not only prospectively but actually taking (bearing) away the sin of the world (John 1:29). How do we speak of the blood of Christ? In the...

Continue reading

Ronald J. Van Overloop is a missionary-pastor of the Protestant Reformed Churches in Northwest Chicago. (The thought patterns of this article are unashamedly based on an excellent book, which I would highly recommend all readers to obtain and read. It is A Vision For Missions, by Tom Wells, The Banner Of Truth Trust, 1985.) Evangelism and mission work are conducted and performed for a variety of reasons. Evangelism is performed because God and Jesus command that it be done. Also there is the need for the gospel on the part of those who are the object of the work. And, thirdly,...

Continue reading

In previous articles we have seen that our adoption as the children of God is predestinated from eternity by God the Father and prepared and sealed in time through the work of Christ, the First-begotten Son. Now we turn to the third phase in the revelation of the wonder of our Sonship, the work of the Holy Spirit as the Spirit of adoption. It is through the Spirit of adoption that the adoption of sons is possessed by the children of God. 

Continue reading

Robert C. Harbach is a minister emeritus in the Protestant Reformed Churches. In the sixteenth chapter of John’s Gospel we have two sections: (1) warning (John 16:1-6), and (2) encouragement John 16:7-33). In the latter section we have these words, “Do ye now believe? Behold, the hour cometh, yea, is now come, that ye shall be scattered, every man to his own, and shall leave Me alone; and yet I am not alone, because the Father is with Me” (John 16:31-32). Jesus’ “disciples (had) said unto Him . . . ‘Now we are sure that Thou knowest all things, and needest...

Continue reading

The final phase in the revelation of our adoption as God’s children takes place in the judgment day. The adoption of sons which God has predestinated in His eternal counsel and prepared in Christ, and which we possess through the Spirit of adoption is perfected when at last we leave our earthly house of this tabernacle and receive from God a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens (II Cor. 5:1).

Continue reading