All Articles For Go Ye Into All the World

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Christ is pleased to gather His eternally chosen church by His Word and Spirit from all the nations of the earth. The same good pleasure of God has also determined that the nations from which the church is gathered are not identical, but very different in many respects, including wealth. This dif­ference, which God has established and governs by His providence, is one with which the church must reckon, also in regard to the giving of financial assistance in cross-economic situations. In fact, because the gap between the richer and poorer nations is becoming ever wider, the need for careful...

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The mystery! From the beginning of the world it has been hid in God. God gave all kinds of evidence regarding the mystery in the Old Testament. The pieces of the puzzle were all there. But the mystery was not solved by the sons of men then. They could not assemble the facts, even though they had them all. This is true because that mystery takes a work of God through His Spirit. Today that mystery has been revealed to the church in the New Testament by the holy apostles and prophet: “That the Gentiles should be fellow heirs, and...

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Previous article in this series: June 2012, p. 396.   Previously, we considered that the emphasis in modern missions is that it be counter-cultural, contextual, and ecological. Now, we will con­sider two more trends in present-day missions that are mentioned by the late Prof. Bosch in his book Believ­ing in the Future. A fourth trend worth considering is that modern missions should be “ecumenical.”¹ It is argued that for modern missions to be successful and gain more converts than ever before in the eastern hemisphere or the western hemisphere, it must minimize and eventu­ally eliminate any substantial differences between de­nominations....

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Previous article in this series: October 1, 2012, p. 14. The trends in modern missions that we have considered thus far were that missions ought to be counter-cultural, contextual, ecological, ecumenical, and laity-led. The final trend, as we indi­cated last time, is perhaps the most alarming and fun­damentally mistaken. It is that modern missions must be taught “with an uncertain faith.” This trend comes from the statement of Prof. Bosch, who wrote that “faith embraces itself and the doubt about itself.”¹ For him, this is the faith that must be preached in missions. This is not the first time in...

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Previous article in this series: April 15, 2012, p. 331.   This is the mystery of the church: people of many nations (the Gentiles) are made fellow heirs, and of the same body with the church of the Old Testament (Eph. 3:6). Christ has abolished the Old Testament ceremonies of the law in order to make in Himself of two (Jews and Gentiles) one new man (Eph. 2:15). The church is no longer limited to one nation. It has become universal. This mystery was hid in God from the beginning of the world. But according to God’s eternal purpose, which...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2012, p. 248. Where are we to look if we desire to find the laws of God for human culture and soci­ety? How does God teach us how to run a business, a government, or an educational institution? Those who embrace “Reformational” theology¹ would point us to the creation. Embedded in the creation itself, they say, is the word of God that teaches us how we are to do these things. But what about the Scriptures? The Scriptures, they say, do set forth for us some general information to point us in the...

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There are trends and errors that affect modern church missions today of which we should be aware. Some of these trends are mentioned, for example, in the writings of prominent church theo­logians about current and future church missions. One such writer is the late Prof. David J. Bosch, a South Af­rican missiologist who became a professor at the Uni­versity of South Africa in 1971. He has written helpful summaries about the history of missions by the church in the New Testament till the present, but his influen­tial books (Transforming Missions, Witness to the World, and Believing in the Future) demonstrate...

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Previous article in this series: April 1, 2012, p. 295. A self-propagating church, as we noted last time, is one that is faithful to the great commission. She is mission minded. She is busy in the work of spreading the precious truths of the gospel in her own land and to her own countrymen. Last time we saw that certain pitfalls must be avoid­ed, especially as regards the use of foreign funds. We now turn to the positive aspects of working toward the goal of establishing such churches. The first step in establishing a self-propagating church is to teach the...

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The Ephesian believers lived during a pivotal period in the history of the church. It was that time, soon after Christ’s ascension into heaven, when God chose to reveal to His church what had been hid in Him since the beginning of time (Eph. 3:9). That which God was now revealing to the early New Testament church had “in other ages” remained a mystery to the sons of men (v. 5). Now the saints in Ephesus are privileged to receive the labors of a man to whom this mystery had been revealed: the great apostle Paul. Paul writes in Ephesians...

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Rev. Kortering is a Protestant Reformed minister-on-loan to Singapore. The public media here in Singapore have been enjoying a lively discussion on the relationship between morality and religion. It was prompted by a monograph written by two professors of the National University of Singapore in which they analyzed the responses of citizens in connection with the 1990 Census. People were asked questions about their religious practices. By comparing these answers with the ones of the census of 1980, the government learned what changes had taken place. They learned that Christianity had made the greatest gains—45,000 new adherents, making up 12.5%...

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