All Articles For Go Ye Into All the World

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Previous article in this series: March 15, 2014, p. 278. The Form for the Ordination of Missionaries in the Protestant Reformed Churches is employed to ordain missionaries to be sent either to the heathen or to the dispersed. A mission work directed “to the heathen” has become synonymous with foreign mission work. A missionary sent “to the dispersed” labors in our own country or other Christianized lands. From the Form it is clear what is meant by those who are dispersed. They are the scattered (dispersed) sheep of Christ’s pasture. These sheep had ancestors that were faithful members of the...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2014, p. 256. In this article we continue to examine one of the paragraphs of the preamble to the constitution of the Domestic Mission Committee of the Protestant Reformed Churches. That paragraph reads: We believe that this missionary activity includes the work of church extension and church reformation, as well as the task of carrying out the Gospel to the unchurched and heathen. However, we are convinced that our present duty lies primarily in the field of church extension and church reformation (1942 Acts of Synod, p. 26). In our last two articles...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2014, p. 178. In our first article on this subject we defined what church extension and church reformation were. We concluded that article with the thought that many in our churches believe that church extension (or domestic missions) may be accomplished only by means of church reformation. The result has been that in the past we have, for the most part, limited our domestic mission work to church reformation. We are going to pursue this more in coming articles. But there is one more matter in our definition of terms that needs addressing....

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In 1942 the first draft of the Constitution of the Mission Committee of the Protestant Reformed Churches was forged and proposed to the synod of that year. The second paragraph of the proposed pream­ble to the constitution carefully expressed the sentiment of many in the churches at that time. We believe that this missionary activity includes the work of church extension, and church reformation, as well as the task of carrying out the Gospel to the unchurched and heathen. Although we look forward to the time that the way will be opened for us to labor among the heathen, both...

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Perhaps you have never thought of the question in the title before. In the July 2012 issue of the mis­sions magazine Evangelical Missions Quarterly, Professor Lee Beach, a professor of Christian missions at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, raises this question about Queen Esther of the Old Testament as an example for foreign missions. Is Queen Esther a model for foreign missions today? “Yes,” teaches Prof. Beach. Prof. Beach promotes this answer in light of the dif­ficulty in reaching limited-access nations and cultures. Limited-access nations and cultures are those who might allow people who may be Christians to...

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Previous article in this series: June 2013, p. 404. John the Baptist understood and believed that tran­sition was a “must.” Christ “must” increase, and he “must” decrease. What does that mean? First, the transition from John the Baptist to Jesus was necessary because that was the will of God. It was the will of God that once the forerunner’s work was completed, then Christ would fulfill His earthly ministry. God’s purpose was not for John to continue His ministry side-by-side with Jesus for three-and-a-half years. It was the will of God that John’s work come to an end after only...

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Among other significant parts and stages in mission work, there is this one, which ought not to be overlooked, namely, that of transi­tion. John the Baptist experienced the reality of it and confessed his response to it in the words of John 3:30, quoted as the title for this article. The apostles expe­rienced it. Preachers experience it when moving from one congregation to another. Faithful missionaries and their calling churches have experienced it. In fact, in the PRCA foreign mission labors in the Philippines, the missionaries have experienced an example of the same phenomenon very recently. What John the Bap­tist...

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Previous article in this series: March 15, 2013, p. 282. What is a self-supporting church? How is the goal of having such churches at­tained? Does this preclude all financial assistance? If not, how can we give money in such a way as to avoid dependence? Obviously a “self-supporting” church supports itself. The church supports its own ministers and ministerial training. The church supports and does its own benevolence work. The church supports its own building projects and mission work. In a nutshell, a self-supporting church does not depend upon financial support from others. To accomplish this, we need first of...

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Previous article in this series: May 1, 2012, p. 356. Money plays a significant role in missions. In fact, we could not do mission work without it. We need money in order to investigate fields. We need money to prepare men to be missionar­ies, and to support those men and their families as they do the work on our behalf. We need money for mission field expenses, such as travel, literature, conferences, ministerial training, etc. Few would disagree that the work of preaching the gospel in all the world with a view to establishing Reformed congregations cannot be accomplished without...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2013, p. 177.   A ready cheerfulness to give (II Cor. 9:7) and a giving according to how God has prospered us (I Cor. 16:1-2) are important elements in the believer’s giving to needy causes, especially in the church. But are these the only elements in the good giving of benevolence or other gifts, especially to fellow saints who live on the poorer side of an economic gap? In connection especially with missions in developing countries, it should be understood that also the exercise of godly wisdom is an important part of proper...

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