All Articles For Faith Of Our Fathers

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James D. Slopsema is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Randolph, Wisconsin. Infant Baptism (2) In our previous article on infant baptism we saw from the baptism form that whereas our children are without their knowledge partakers of the condemnation in Adam, so also are they without their knowledge received unto grace in Christ. This truth is evident from the fact that God establishes His covenant of grace with believers and their seed. This the baptism form demonstrates by calling our attention to Genesis 17:7 andActs 2:39. Having laid down this very important truth, the baptism form proceeds to call our...

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Understanding the Sacraments Baptism is one of the two sacraments Christ has instituted in the Christian church. There are many erroneous views that have arisen concerning the sacraments. There are those, for example, who claim that the sacraments themselves work salvation. The water of baptism itself has the power to wash away sin. The bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper themselves nourish the soul to life eternal. Those who hold these views also elevate the sacraments, particularly the Lords Supper, to the place of prominence in worship, even above the preaching. Then there are those who go to the...

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The Impurity of Our Souls Signified According to the opening statement of the Baptism form there are three principal parts to the doctrine of holy baptism. A quick survey of the Baptism form reveals that these three principal parts of baptism follow the three-fold division of the Heidelberg Catechism: how great my sins and miseries are; how I am delivered from my sins and miseries; how I shall express my gratitude to God for such deliverance. The first principal part of the doctrine of baptism is “that we with our children are conceived and born in sin, and therefore are...

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At the annual meeting of the editors of The Standard Bearer held this past June, it was determined that the subject content of this rubric would be the Westminster Confession.  It might well be asked: why consider the Westminster Confession, when it is not one of the creeds of the Protestant Reformed Churches? There were no specific grounds given for the decision; but permit me to suggest some possible reasons for our considering of this creed. 

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An overture appeared at our last Synod that there be included in our Psalter “the three early-church Trinitarian Creeds: the Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed, the Athanasian Creed; with a brief historical introduction to each creed.” The first and chief ground of the overture was that although we do receive these creeds according to Article 9 of the Belgic Confession, yet the Nicene and Athanasian Creeds are not easily accessible to our people and are thus also unfamiliar. 

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HISTORY (cont’d) The statement of faith adopted by the Council of Nicea (AD 325) had certainly been a victory for the truth. Nicea had condemned the error of Arius that Jesus was merely a creature and not truly God. Positively, Nicea had confessed that Jesus Christ is “the Son of God, begotten of the Father (the only begotten, i.e., .of the essence of the Father, God of God, and) Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father.” 

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