All Articles For Editorial

Results 51 to 60 of 2163

The two most recent editorials have lamented the schism in the Protestant Reformed Churches (PRC) and warned of the continued threat to these churches. Hearts are heavy for brothers and sisters we love, who have not only left the fellowship of the PRC but charged her with the most serious evils. For them the PRC have so apostatized that it would be grossest sin not to come out from them and be separate. Their “Act of Separation” declares the PRC to have lost the marks of the true church (see the editorial of March 15). Now, those who wrote the...

Continue reading

The last editorial (March 1) was a lament for the schism in the PRCA. Our hearts, grieving for the division, look to God for mercy and long for the good of the Protestant Reformed Churches and all her members whom we love. This love motivates this editorial, explaining why membership in the PRCA is membership in the true church. In January of this year, many members of our Byron Center PRC in Michigan separated from the Protestant Reformed Churches. Two elders and three deacons led them out. These five officebearers called all the members of the congregation to come out...

Continue reading

How does the PRC grieve, Father! For almost 100 years Thy grace and mercy have kept these churches. In great weakness, but in the unity of the truth and the bond of peace, we have labored in the name of Jesus Christ. Now, we sit in distress. Distress deeper than most of us have known before. Brothers and sisters have gone out from us. Lovers have departed. Friendships are wounded. Families broken. Churches damaged. What has been so precious to us and which we have taken too for granted—unity and fellowship in the truth of our Lord Jesus—has been fractured....

Continue reading

A review of a book review? Let me explain. The book reviewed is The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation, written by Rod Dreher, a former evangelical who has joined the Greek Orthodox Church. The book is reviewed by Dr. Keith Sewell, professor emeritus of Dordt University. And we are going to review his book review.1 For a reason. Dr. Sewell is of the Kuyperian persuasion, meaning, one who is yet committed to Abraham Kuyper’s perspective that by political action and infiltration of every aspect of culture we as Christians are called to and able to...

Continue reading

It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in man. It is better trust in the Lord than to put confidence in princes. Psalm 118:8, 9 The year of our Lord 2020 was quite a year. Momentous. It was that politically. It was that socially. It was that ecclesiastically. For many, 2020 was momentous in a very personal way. Politically—in light of the presidential election, and what the results portend for the foreseeable future. Socially—in light of the effects of the coronavirus upon life and society, with its resulting edicts of governors and bureaucrats touching every...

Continue reading

As indicated when we ended our previous editorial (Jan. 1, 2021), we intended in this editorial to quote Witsius’ conclusion to his book Antinomians and Neonomians. It is a conclusion worth quoting in full, one written in an irenic spirit but with firmness, laying down what must characterize Reformed theology in the interests of gospel preaching if it is to remain fully biblical. Witsius has deep insight into what must be preserved and insisted upon if the gospel of grace is to be fully preached, which means not neglecting the exhortations unto godliness (commands unto all good works) that must...

Continue reading

We concluded our last editorial (Dec. 15) with a lengthy quote from Witsius’ book Antinomians and Neonomians.1 His assessment of the controverted material was, “In the matter [of the disputation I was asked to assess], there is that [which] I approve, and what I disapprove” (161). What he approved was the antinomians’ desire and goal, namely, “that men may be called off from all presumption upon their own righteousness, and trained up to the exercise of generous piety, which flows from the pure fountain of Divine love” (161). An admirable and proper desire. But there was that which Witsius did...

Continue reading

We come to the heart of the antinomian controversy in England in the late 1600s, that which was most ‘warmly’ disputed among the Protestant theologians and in their congregations, namely, “the utility of holiness,” as Witsius labels it.1 This is simply another way of referring to good works and their place in the life and salvation of the redeemed: their benefit, their usefulness, their incentive, and even in what sense they are necessary. It was an area of dispute (one that has always retained that potential) because of what Rome made of good works, namely, meritorious works. A whole misbegotten...

Continue reading

We continue our consideration of Herman Witsius and his little book, Antinomians and Neonomians.1 The book is a treatise dealing with controversial issues that sorely divided the Protestant churches in Britain, issues that the English theologians sent to Witsius, seeking his help in answering and, hopefully, resolving. The issues ranged from what the imputation of man’s sin to Christ meant for His sinless character and person; from whether faith and repentance were really even necessary for the elect, seeing they were united to Christ from all eternity by God’s decree; to the need in the preaching of stressing the importance...

Continue reading

In the next few editorials we will be quoting Herman Witsius and offering some comments on those quotes. Who was Herman Witsius? A renown Reformed, Dutch theologian of the seventeenth century (1636- 1708). He was a younger contemporary of the better- known theologians, Gijsbert Voetius and Johannes Cocceius—that is, better known to us. In his day, Witsius was as well known and respected as either of those men for his piety and biblical learning. In fact, what added to his reputation was his attempt to reconcile Voetius and Cocceius in their bitter differences over various issues theological and political, though...

Continue reading