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All Articles For Decency and Order

Results 251 to 260 of 296

“Every church shall administer the Lord’s Supper in such a manner as it shall judge most conducive to edification; provided, however, that the outward ceremonies as prescribed in God’s Word be not changed and all superstition be avoided, and that at the conclusion of the sermon and the usual prayers, the form for the administration of the Lord’s Supper, together with the prayer for that purpose, shall be read.” —Article 62, D.K.O. Within the jurisdiction of every consistory is the task of administering the Lord’s Supper in such manner that is most edifying to the congregation. It is not left...

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We have been discussing various sins which become the occasion of ecclesiastical censure when members of the church persist in them and after repeated admonition refuse to repent. In this connection we asked the question whether parents are to be disciplined who refuse to send their children to Christian schools and, more particularly, whether Protestant Reformed parents are the proper objects of censure if they refuse to use the facilities of Protestant Reformed education for their children where these facilities are made available? It is with this question that we are at present concerned. To the best of my knowledge...

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One more reason that is often advanced to support the contention that ecclesiastical censure cannot be applied to those who neglect their calling to use the facilities of Protestant Reformed education where these are made available is the claim that the task of the training of the children is a parental responsibility and, therefore, parents are at liberty to choose the school that they desire for their children. Where they send them is of no concern to anyone else and the responsibility for that decision rests alone on the parents. The church has no right to interfere with this liberty. The point...

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Assisting the Poor The committee of the Christian Reformed Church that some years ago drew up a proposed revision of the church order saw fit to exclude altogether from this revision the matter of Article 83 of our church order. The reader will recall that this article deals with the matter of the deacons providing assistance to the poor who, for sufficient reason, see fit to remove from the congregation. The deacons are to provide according to their discretion an amount that is adequate to enable these poor to reach their new place of residence.

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(Each synod shall be at liberty to solicit and hold correspondence with its neighboring synod or synods in such manner as they shall judge most conducive to general edification.) ― D.K.O. Article 48  The parentheses surrounding the above article indicate that it, like the preceding article, applies to particular synods and, therefore, the matter with which it deals is of no direct concern to us since we have only a General Synod. 

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Clearly the eighty-fourth article of the Church Order is designed to counter the many and serious evils of the hierarchical or collegialistic forms of church government. According to this system, a federation of churches is not considered to be a union of several self-governing churches; but each church is regarded as a sub-division of a big super church that is ruled from the top down. At the top is the Pope whose word is law. At the bottom is the local church which is coerced into submission to the will of the Pope.

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Error in doctrine and offensive conduct are set forth in Article 72 of the Church Order as the two evils that necessitate ecclesiastical discipline. This has been the Reformed position since the days of the Reformation. Various synodical decisions of the past bear this out. The Wezelian Convention of Reformed Churches in 1568 decided “that one who advocated strange teachings and heresies, secretly or publicly, should be disciplined (Chap. VIII, 7), and also that one who led an evil life should be censured (Chap. VIII, 9).” The first regular Synod, Emden, 1571, maintained these two causes for discipline (Art. 26)....

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