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All Articles For Contending for the Faith

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In our preceding article we quoted at length from the Reformed Dogmatics of the late H. Bavinck, in which a brief resume is set forth of the doctrine of the providence of God. We concluded that article by calling attention to the word providence, noting that the word itself is hardly Scriptural but that it has had a place in the history of the doctrine of the Church for ages. H. Bavinck notes that the word itself is of heathen origin, but that it can be used, provided that we understand the Scriptural significance of that which this truth is...

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The Roman Catholic Council of Trent, which met for several years and began its sessions some thirty years after the beginning of the Reformation in 1517, was convened to combat and counteract the rising tide of the Reformation. This council set itself to maintain the doctrinal position and teachings of the Romish Church. It also expressed itself on the subject of sin. Concerning the task and difficulties of this council, Hodge writes as follows, Vol. II, 174 ff.:

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The doctrine of the providence of God is generally treated from the aspect of three elements which constitute the Lord’s providential control of all things: preservation, cooperation and government. Before we call attention to these three elements in particular, we wish to present a brief historical review of this doctrine as set forth by the late Prof. L. Berkhof in his “Reformed Dogmatics, pages 165-166:

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At the end of our preceding article, we quoted the fifth canon or chapter of the Council of Trent of its fifth session, held June 17, 1546, setting forth its decrees concerning original sin. In this fifth canon the Council asserts that through the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred in baptism, the guilt of original sin is remitted, and everything is removed which has the true and proper nature of sin.

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Writing of the doctrine of sin during the early period of the Christian Church in the New Dispensation, and specifically on this doctrine of sin in general, we concluded our preceding article with a quotation from Clement of Alexandria. We now continue with this in this present article.  Justin Martyr ascribes the origin of evil to the sensuous nature, as in his first Apology, chapter 10, “How God is to be served,”

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Fourthly, what does this law of God demand? To this there can be only one answer, in the light of the Word of God. The law of God demands complete perfection, or the entire conformity of the moral nature and conduct of a rational creature with the nature and will of the Lord. We are commanded to love the Lord our God with all our heart and mind and soul and strength. And we love our neighbor as ourselves. This obligation, of course, is limited to the capacity of the creature. It is not limited to the ability of the...

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Schaff, setting forth the creeds of the Evangelical Protestant Churches in his Creeds of Christendom, distinguishes between the creeds of the Evangelical Lutheran Church and the creeds of the Evangelical Reformed Churches. I assume that he makes this distinction because the Lutherans broke away from the rest of the Protestant Churches because they could not endorse the Protestant conception of the Lord’s Supper.

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