All Articles For Contending for the Faith

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We concluded our preceding article with the remark that the late Rev. H. Hoeksema was of the opinion that, although many historians leave the impression that the Synod of Orange A.D. 529, represents a last victory for the Augustinian conception of predestination and sovereign grace, this synod much rather left the impression that it was afraid of the strict Augustinian principles, and that his doctrine was certainly not maintained by this synod.

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Quoting Philip Schaff’s History of the Christian Church in connection with the history of this Pelagian controversy, we were calling attention in our preceding article to this controversy as it developed in Palestine. We called attention to a diocesan synod which was convoked by the bishop John of Jerusalem in June of 415. At this synod a certain Orosius appeared against Pelagius, and he gave information that a council at Carthage had condemned Coelestius (a disciple of Pelagius), and that Augustine had written against his errors.

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It belongs, of course; to the essence of a sacrament that it be instituted by God through Jesus Christ. The sacraments are signs, but all signs are not necessarily sacraments. All things are signs. Bread and water and wine are always signs. God created the entire universe as one gigantic picture. The Lord created the earthly with a view to the heavenly. The heavenly renewal of all things in Christ Jesus does not simply replace the earthy as created with Adam at its head.

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In our preceding article, we noted that the scene had shifted to Rome, in connection with the historical development of the Pelagian controversy, as presented by Philip Schaff in his History of the Christian Church, Vol. III, 797 ff. Pope Innocent expressed full agreement with the condemnation of Pelagius, Coelestius, and their adherents. However, Innocent died in 417 and Pope Zosimus, who succeeded him, at first agreed with the Pelagians and condemned the North African bishops for their attack upon and condemnation of Pelagius.

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Before calling attention to the writings of Hodge and Calvin on the Scriptural doctrine of creation, we wish to quote briefly from two or three others.  First, we would quote from St. Hilary of Poitiers. He is declared to have been of the greatest, yet least studied, of the Fathers of the Western Church. This disciple of Origin was born about the year 300 A.D., and he died in the year 367. He became bishop of Poitiers about the year 350, but later went into exile and was replaced by an Arian, one who denied the eternal Godhead of the...

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In this article we conclude our discussion, of the Reformed view of the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. This article also concludes our series on the Church and the Sacraments which began years ago when this rubric was introduced into our Standard Bearer. In this series we have discussed the views of the Church and the sacraments of baptism and that of the Lord’s Supper as maintained and developed in the Church of God since the days of the apostles. We now conclude this series.

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The three elements of the providence of God are preservation, cooperation, and government. In our last article we called attention to the Lord’s preservation of all things. In this article we wish to call attention to that phase of the providence of the Lord that is known as government. We wish to reserve our last article for the discussion of cooperation because this aspect of the providence of God concerns the relation of sin to God’s sovereign and constant control over all things. We have mentioned that there are three elements which constitute the doctrine of the providence of God.

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