All Articles For Contending for the Faith

Results 171 to 180 of 411

In his zeal against his old enemy Philip had called, probably as early as 1305, for the canonization of Coelestine V. A second time, in 1307. Boniface’s condemnation was pressed upon Clement by the king in person. But the pope knew how to prolong the prosecution on all sorts of pretexts. Philip represented himself as concerned for the interests of religion, and Nogaret and the other conspirators insisted that the assault at Avignon was a religious act, negotium fidei. Nogaret sent forth no less than twelve apologies defending himself for his part in the assault.

Continue reading

The coronation ceremonies were on a splendid scale. But the size of Rome, whose population at this time may not have exceeded thirty-five thousand, must be taken into account when we compare them with the pageants of the ancient city. At the enthronization in St.

Continue reading

VIEWS DURING THE THIRD PERIOD (750-1517 A.D.) THE SUPREMACY OF THE POPE, THE DECLINE OF THE PAPACY AND THE AVIGNON EXILE. (A.D. 1294-1377)  The next year, 1325, Lewis suffered a severe defeat from Leopold of Austria, who had entered into a compact to put Charles IV of France on the German throne. He went sol far as to express his readiness, in the compact of Ulm, 1326, to surrender the German crown to Frederick, provided he himself was confirmed in his right to Italy and the imperial dignity. At this juncture Leopold died. 

Continue reading

Gregory was, in his own time, and has been since, the subject both of the highest praise and of the severest censure. Modern historians agree in giving him credit for the honesty and courage of his convictions, and concede the purity and loftiness of his motives and aims. He is the typical representative of papal absolutism in the Middle Ages in conflict with imperial absolutism. He combined personal integrity, consummate statesmanship, and monastic contempt of the world.

Continue reading

The marks, by which the true Church is known, are designated in Article 29 of our Confession of Faith as the preaching of the pure gospel, the maintaining of the pure administration of the sacraments and the exercise of church or Christian discipline. The Reformers were unanimous in their determination that the Holy Scriptures were the only norm or standard of the Church, and they designated accordingly (according to the Holy Scriptures as the only norm) the marks whereby the true church could be distinguished from the false church. However, there was a slight difference among them. Luther enumerated 7...

Continue reading