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In January of 1994, a meeting was held in the basement of Hope PRC to discuss the possibility and feasibility of forming a new congregation. On June 5, 1994, we began separate services at the Grand Valley Orthodox Christian Reformed Church on the corner of 8th Avenue and Lake Michigan Dr. We had to work around Grand Valley’s services, which were 9:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. We met at 1:00 in the afternoon and 7:30 in the evening. Our pulpit was always supplied by either visiting ministers or seminary students. Rev. P. Breen consented to preach three Sunday evenings each...

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The following was written by Doon member Vi DeBoer. Nestled quietly in the very northwest corner of the state of Iowa, which is in the north central part of the United States, is the small village of Doon. Not much to take note of by human standards, but home for 93 years to a small congregation of believers. The Doon Protestant Reformed Church was born out of the Christian Reformed Churches in the area in 1926. The Lord used the weak means of preaching by various Protesting Christian Reformed ministers to bring about the formation of the Doon Protesting Reformed...

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By God’s grace, Georgetown PRC just celebrated her 25th Anniversary in 2019. Currently a congregation of 154 families and 32 individuals, we began as a group of 34 families and 1 individual. Georgetown is the 26th congregation to be organized in our beloved Protestant Reformed denomination. Our official organization took place on March 2, 1994 in the auditorium of Hudsonville PRC. On Au­gust 21, 1994 our first pastor, Rev. Ron VanOverloop, preached his inaugural sermon on Ephesians 4:19. The church began meeting first at Bauer Elementary and then moved to Heritage Christian School. The land at 7146 48th Avenue was...

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In July of 1942, Rev. C. Hanko came to the Randolph area and began to give speeches. Later, Rev. H. Hoeksema came with him and the Reformed truth was expounded. The church was organized in August of 1943 with eight families and several individuals. Worship services were held in the Congregational church in the afternoons and evenings. Special meetings and catechism classes were held in various homes. Later, a “ basement church” was purchased from the CRC and was used until 1974, when a new building was built beside the basement church. That building was outgrown and a new sanctuary...

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In the 1970s the city of Hudsonville, Michigan was experiencing a population growth that also was reflected in the Hudsonville Protestant Reformed Church. Hudsonville PRC outgrew its little white building on the southeast corner of VanBuren and School Street, and decided to relocate to a brand new facility on a hill less than a mile away on 32nd Avenue. In the next few years the congregation experienced more steady growth in membership, so a decision was made to establish a daughter congregation in Byron Center, Michigan in order to help alleviate overcrowd­ing in the “new” church building. In 1994 the...

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Peace Protestant Reformed Church is located in Dyer, Indiana. Our pastor is Rev. Ryan Barnhill. We are a congregation of 47 families, seven single adults, and a quiver full of 104 baptized children. Our roots are founded in the South Holland PRC, as we are a daughter of that congregation. Peace was organized as a church in 1988. Our first meeting place was Illiana Christian High School in Lansing, IL. We met there for seven years, and then built our first church building and parsonage in Lansing, Illinois. That building served us well for 22 years. Two years ago, we...

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Compiled by Jan Westra, edited by Brittany Gritters The history of the Hull Protestant Reformed Church goes back to the beginning of the Protestant Reformed denomination. On March 16, 1925, just a few weeks after a temporary organization called the Protesting Christian Reformed Churches had been organized in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the Protesting Christian Reformed Church of Hull, Iowa, was organized under the leadership of Rev. H. Hoeksema with a membership of 32 families. After only five months, a new parsonage was ready and occupied by Rev. B.J. Danhof. And after only three more months, the congregation met for the...

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Thanks to Mr. Cal Kalsbeek for putting this information us! The beginning of Hope’s existence goes back to 1916. If it hadn’t been for a 1914 decision of the Michigan State Highway Department, Hope might never have come into existence. At that time the farmers located in the hook-like bend in the Grand River had access to the Christian Reformed Church across the river only by means of the state-maintained ferry. The state’s decision to abandon the ferry in 1914 left the believers in the bend with two options, travel long distances by means of horse-drawn carriages or establish a...

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[With this issue we begin our church profiles. The early bird gets the worm, they say, and Edgerton was the first to submit a profile. Therefore, we publish theirs first. Thanks to Al Brummel from Edgerton for submitting this interesting information.] In 1936 the Mission Committee of the Protestant Reformed Churches sent out the first home missionary, Rev. B. Kok. As a result, the congregation here in Edgerton, Minnesota was organized in 1938 with 13 fam­ilies. After meeting for a short while in a community building, we built a church and parsonage, which are still in use today. The parsonage...

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