All Articles For Bring the Books

Results 71 to 80 of 128

Thomas Becket: Warrior, Priest, Rebel, by John Guy (New York: Random House, 2012). Pp. 424. $35.00 (cloth). Reviewed by David J. Engelsma. For the laymen, as well as the clergy, who enjoy riveting history told by a first-rate historian in superb prose, John Guy’s new biography of Thomas Becket is a delight. From the original sources and with critical judgment of later, usually hagiographic, accounts, biographer Guy relates the fascinating life and famed death of the twelfth century archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket. Lifted from lowly origins to the secular and political heights of chancellor of England by King Henry...

Continue reading

God In Our Midst: The Tabernacle and Our Re­lationship With God, by Daniel R. Hyde. Sanford, FL: Reformation Trust Publishing, 2012. 255 pages. Hardcover $18.00; ebook $9.00. ISBN 978-1-56769-281-5. Reviewed by Douglas J. Kuiper. “God created the world in six days, but he used forty to instruct Moses about the tabernacle. Little over one chapter was needed to describe the structure of the world, but six were used for the tab­ernacle.” (Herman Witsius, as quoted on page 202 of this book). This fact alone justifies the writing and publishing of this volume. My own interest in reading it was height­ened...

Continue reading

Empty Arms, by Pam Vredevelt. Published by Multnomah, 2001, 176 pages paper. [Reviewed by Brenda Hoekstra.] In an age where the mindset is about liability and com­pensation, even God’s people can get caught up in wondering why some things have to happen the way that they do. An event going awry often gets us started mentally replaying our lives. When some small thing happens that we are not happy about, we wonder what could have been done differently, and where we can go to have it made up to us or ‘fixed’ for us. For some people, something happens in...

Continue reading

Once again we feature a few brief book notes on some new titles that are worthy of your attention. Envisioning Hope College: Letters written by Albertus C. Van Raalte to Philip Phelps Jr., 1857 to 1875. Edited by Elton J. Bruins and Karen G. Schakel. Van Raalte Press & Eerdmans Publishing, 2011. 519 pp. $49.00 (hardcover). This new title in the “Historical Series of the Re­formed Church in America” (No. 71) will be of value not only to those who have ties to Holland, MI (which Van Raalte founded) and to Hope College (of which Phelps became the first president),...

Continue reading

What is the Mission of the Church? Making Sense of Social Justice, Shalom, and the Great Commission, by Kevin DeYoung and Greg Gilbert. Wheaton, Crossway, 2011. 288 pages. Softcover. ISBN 978-1-4335-2690-9. [Reviewed by Rev. Cory Griess.] “Be missional,” “transform culture,” “build the kingdom,” “be incarnational,” “be Jesus to the world,” “ensure social justice,” “be kingdom agents,” “seek the Shalom of the city.” If you have heard any of these buzzwords you have come into contact with the modern view of the mission of the church in the world. Kevin DeYoung and Greg Gilbert have written a book to examine carefully...

Continue reading

Federal Vision: Heresy at the Root, by David J. Engelsma. Jenison, Michigan: Reformed Free Publishing Association, 2012. 252 pages. Hardback. [Reviewed by Martyn Mc Geown.] This reviewer grew up in a Presbyterian denomi­nation in Ireland. Although the church was not very doctrinal, one thing sticks in my head even now. It concerns baptism. At every occasion of baptism, the minister said (whether this was an official baptismal form I do not know), “Baptism is a testimony to the divine initiative, that God takes the first step in our salvation . . . .” I often wondered what that meant, but...

Continue reading

Shepherding a Child’s Heart, by Tedd Tripp. Shep­herd Press, 1995, paperback, 215 pages (also available as a Kindle ebook). [Reviewed by Dr. Julian Kennedy, CPRC, Ballymena.] This is a book I wish I had read over 20 years ago, before I had my first child. It is a thoroughly bibli­cal approach to child-rearing, and I highly recommend it. The call to raise your children means it must be a priority, requiring study, thought, prayer, and action. You have limited time and only one opportunity to raise your children in God’s ways. In this book Tripp guides us through the “why’s”...

Continue reading

New (and Old) Noteworthy Books Communion with God: Reformed Spirituality, Herman Hoek­sema; edited by David J. Engelsma. Reformed Free Publishing Association (rfpa.org), 2011. 352 pp. $28.95 (hardcover). This is the anticipated follow-up volume of meditations (volume one was Peace for the Troubled Heart, 2010) originally written (some in Dutch) in the Standard Bearer by noted Reformed pastor-theologian and co-founder of the Protestant Reformed Churches, Herman Hoeksema. This marvelous collection focuses on the believer’s “sweet” covenant fellowship with the triune God in Jesus Christ. The chapters are arranged into three parts: Com­munion with God, Christian Experience, and Christian Activity. Great devotional...

Continue reading

* Calvin’s preface to the Geneva Psalter of 1543. As to public prayers, there are two kinds: the one consists of words alone; the other includes music. And this is no recent invention. For since the very beginning of the church it has been this way, as we may learn from history books. Nor does St. Paul himself speak only of prayer by word of mouth, but also of singing. And in truth, we know from experience that song has a great power and strength to move and inflame the hearts of men to invoke and praise God with a...

Continue reading

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church, Volume 7: Our Own Time, by Hughes Oliphant Old. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010. Pp. Xx + 714. Paper. ISBN 978-0-8028-1771-6. [Reviewed by Angus Stewart.] Seven Monumental Volumes “A work of supererogation”—that is how one minister describes reading all seven volumes of Hughes Oliphant Old’s The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church(1998-2010). I couldn’t disagree more! Having read every page of all seven volumes and having eagerly waited for them to come off the press, I can say that I have...

Continue reading