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6. And it will come to pass in. that day that there will not be precious light, but dimness. 7. And the day will be one, It will be known to Jehovah, not day and not night. And it will come to pass at the time of the evening that it will be light

Also the thing of which this verse speaks will come to pass in. “that day,” this present dispensation of grace. “That day,” therefore, is not a day of twenty-four hours, but a period or epoch. Denoted is what is called in John’s epistles the “last hour.” In “that day” there will not be the precious light but dimness. And the day will be one, one of its kind. There has never been, nor is there now a day like it. It’s a wonderful day. I will be known to Jehovah, to Christ. He is its Lord; it will be His gracious gift to His people. This only day will not be wholly day, clear, bright; on the other hand, it will not be wholly night, dark. It will thus, be characterized by a dimness in this Christian dispensation. But this only day will be freed from its dimness. At the time of its evening it will be light, that is, break forth in heavenly brilliance. It is, therefore, an only day also in this respect that it is not characterized by alternation of light and darkness. 

What precisely may be the meaning of this all? Is the reference here to that working of God in nature predicted by Joel, “And I will shew wonders in heaven above, and signs in the earth beneath; blood and fire and vapor and smoke; the sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before that great and notable day of the Lord come.” When Christ was on the cross the sun was turned into darkness for three dreadful hours. Before His second return and as this dispensation draws to a close, the sun will again and perhaps over and over be turned into darkness and the moon into blood. In the vision of John the sun becomes black as sackcloth and at another time a certain part of it is smitten. Is this the dreadful phenomenon of which our prophet is speaking in the verses under consideration? Those who hold to this view point to the fact that in some Handwritings the Hebrew of verse 6 reads (in translation), “Not will there be light; the precious. or glorious ones will be dimmed” (literally congealed). The disputed expression is the verbal form will be dimmed. In most Handwritings, according to the authorities, the reading is dimness, which is a nominal. Those who favor the reading, “the precious ones will be dimmed,” instead of, “there will not be the precious light but dimness,” take the expression precious or glorious ones,” to indicate the stars of the firmament of the heavens including the sun, and accordingly take the meaning to be, “There will be no light; for the stars will be dimmed” (or the stars will withdraw themselves). In this way proof is provided for the view that the words of our prophet refer to a working of God identical to that foretold by the prophet Joel. But how easy it would have been for our prophet to have said simply, “The stars will be withdrawn,” or “the sun shall be turned into darkness,” if this is the message that he meant to convey. Besides, according to verse 7 the dimness is continuous during this entire present dispensation, which could not be the case, if it were a dimness that is caused by an occasional blackening of the sun. For such will be the character of this working of God in this last hour; it will be occasional. For if it were otherwise, if in this Christian dispensation the sun were permanently blackened, all life on earth would soon perish. Also it may be questioned whether the “glorious or precious ones” are the stars of the firmament. The expression can also denote God’s people, the true believers of this dispensation. What it means is that the view that the message of the verses under consideration is, that the stars of the firmament of the heavens will withdraw themselves is without any real support in any of the Handwritings. In no Handwriting does the Hebrew of these verses literally set forth such an idea. And therefore it is not necessary to choose between the two readings. For not only that there is no conflict between them, but both set forth the same thought essentially and therefore supplement the one the other. 

What then is the message of these verses? If the idea of this message is to be grasped, understanding must be had of what is meant by the expression “only day” in this context. Indicated is the eternal day or Sabbath as begun by God’s believing people in this life. It would be a mistake—a mistake some make—of identifying this “only day” with this Christian dispensation called “that day” in these verses. This “only day” is eternal; it is the everlasting Sabbath that Christ merited for His people and that, as the resurrected and glorified Christ, He has entered with them. This Christian dispensation is temporal; it will be terminated by the second coming of Christ. The expression “only day” as a sentence element of verses 6, 7 may best be clarified by a paraphrase of these verses as follows:

It will come to pass in that day—this Christian dispensation—that there will not be the precious light of this “only day,” everlasting Sabbath, eternal rest. In “that day” this Sabbath “only day” will be dim. This will be owing to the fact that in “that day,” this present dispensation, the precious or glorious ones—God’s believing people—will be dimmed as to their heavenly light by the issues of their sinful flesh. This light will not yet shine as it one day will when the Church is with Christ in glory. Hence, this “only day” will also be dim in “that day.” For seeing that this “only day” is the everlasting Sabbath as kept and lived by the believers, it follows that this “only day” can be no brighter than the believers are perfect. This “only day” therefore will not be day in “that day;” that is, it will not be clear as day; nor, on the other hand, will it be night, that is, total darkness; but it will be characterized by dimness as are the believers themselves. This glorious day, eternal Sabbath, is surely one, only. There is no day to be compared with it. It is known to Christ, seeing that He merited it by His death on the cross and is therefore its Lord. The dimness of this “only day” will surely end with His return. For then God’s people will appear with Him in glory. Then the righteousness of this “only day,” which is the righteousness of Christ and of His people, will go forth as brightness, and the salvation thereof as a lamp that burneth. 

And so it is plain that keeping this “only day” is to cease from sin and to yield oneself to Christ; it is to see all God’s marvelous works that He accomplished through Christ and to say from the heart: Behold, it is very good. And so it is also plain that the light of which these verses speak is not sun light, light physical, nor natural light, the light of unsanctified reason, hut true light, the light of life, the light of true knowledge of God, of righteousness and holiness. It is the light of the everlasting day, eternal Sabbath. It is the light that will shine in the new Jerusalem and with what saving and healing and beautifying effect is revealed in the vision of John. The great city descends out of heaven from God. It has the glory of God, for the tabernacle of God is with men, and He, himself, dwells with them, and they are His people. And He wipes away all tears from their eyes; and there is no more death there, nor sorrow, nor crying nor any more pain. And there is no more night there; and they need no candle, neither light of the sun, for the Lord giveth them light. 

It is to this light that the expressions occurring in these verses, “There is not the precious light,” and, “it will be light,” have reference. And so the darkness of which these verses speak is the darkness of sin, the night of the wrath of God and of the curse stalking the earth and of death and hell and the grave and all the nameless suffering of this present time. 

Once it was day and once it was light in the first paradise. The light shone there in the first man, created as he was in God’s image. Not that the light shone in him with a heavenly brightness. Surely no. It could not, seeing that, being of the earth, earthy, and as yet having no need of Christ as Savior, he was not seeing God in Christ’s face but only through the medium of this earthy. And through this medium God shone upon him and in his heart. And walking in the light, his fellowship was with God. For God is light and in Him there is no darkness at all. 

But the first man did not abide in the light, continue in the rest of that first day, the rest of creation. He subjected himself to sin, and the sun of righteousness went under, and the day was turned into night. Then God manifested Himself as Savior. He came with the promise of that only day. And the heirs of the promise were persuaded, and by faith they saw afar off the glimmering of that day and rejoiced. And hope made not ashamed. The promise was fulfilled by Christ in His blotting out by His death all the sins of the heirs, and in His being raised because of their justification, and exalted at the right hand of the throne. In Him the sun of righteousness rose never again to go down, seeing that He is the Mediator of an eternal covenant. The night is past; it is day. For as the Lord of the Sabbath He shines in the hearts of His own and lo, they are conformed according to His likeness. And their light shines. But the light is not clear. It is not day; it is not night. But at the time of the evening it will be light, gloriously light in the New Jerusalem, the Holy City. 

G.M.O.

6. And it will come to pass in. that day that there will not be precious light, but dimness. 7. And the day will be one, It will be known to Jehovah, not day and not night. And it will come to pass at the time of the evening that it will be light

Also the thing of which this verse speaks will come to pass in. “that day,” this present dispensation of grace. “That day,” therefore, is not a day of twenty-four hours, but a period or epoch. Denoted is what is called in John’s epistles the “last hour.” In “that day” there will not be the precious light but dimness. And the day will be one, one of its kind. There has never been, nor is there now a day like it. It’s a wonderful day. I will be known to Jehovah, to Christ. He is its Lord; it will be His gracious gift to His people. This only day will not be wholly day, clear, bright; on the other hand, it will not be wholly night, dark. It will thus, be characterized by a dimness in this Christian dispensation. But this only day will be freed from its dimness. At the time of its evening it will be light, that is, break forth in heavenly brilliance. It is, therefore, an only day also in this respect that it is not characterized by alternation of light and darkness. 

What precisely may be the meaning of this all? Is the reference here to that working of God in nature predicted by Joel, “And I will shew wonders in heaven above, and signs in the earth beneath; blood and fire and vapor and smoke; the sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before that great and notable day of the Lord come.” When Christ was on the cross the sun was turned into darkness for three dreadful hours. Before His second return and as this dispensation draws to a close, the sun will again and perhaps over and over be turned into darkness and the moon into blood. In the vision of John the sun becomes black as sackcloth and at another time a certain part of it is smitten. Is this the dreadful phenomenon of which our prophet is speaking in the verses under consideration? Those who hold to this view point to the fact that in some Handwritings the Hebrew of verse 6 reads (in translation), “Not will there be light; the precious. or glorious ones will be dimmed” (literally congealed). The disputed expression is the verbal form will be dimmed. In most Handwritings, according to the authorities, the reading is dimness, which is a nominal. Those who favor the reading, “the precious ones will be dimmed,” instead of, “there will not be the precious light but dimness,” take the expression precious or glorious ones,” to indicate the stars of the firmament of the heavens including the sun, and accordingly take the meaning to be, “There will be no light; for the stars will be dimmed” (or the stars will withdraw themselves). In this way proof is provided for the view that the words of our prophet refer to a working of God identical to that foretold by the prophet Joel. But how easy it would have been for our prophet to have said simply, “The stars will be withdrawn,” or “the sun shall be turned into darkness,” if this is the message that he meant to convey. Besides, according to verse 7 the dimness is continuous during this entire present dispensation, which could not be the case, if it were a dimness that is caused by an occasional blackening of the sun. For such will be the character of this working of God in this last hour; it will be occasional. For if it were otherwise, if in this Christian dispensation the sun were permanently blackened, all life on earth would soon perish. Also it may be questioned whether the “glorious or precious ones” are the stars of the firmament. The expression can also denote God’s people, the true believers of this dispensation. What it means is that the view that the message of the verses under consideration is, that the stars of the firmament of the heavens will withdraw themselves is without any real support in any of the Handwritings. In no Handwriting does the Hebrew of these verses literally set forth such an idea. And therefore it is not necessary to choose between the two readings. For not only that there is no conflict between them, but both set forth the same thought essentially and therefore supplement the one the other. 

What then is the message of these verses? If the idea of this message is to be grasped, understanding must be had of what is meant by the expression “only day” in this context. Indicated is the eternal day or Sabbath as begun by God’s believing people in this life. It would be a mistake—a mistake some make—of identifying this “only day” with this Christian dispensation called “that day” in these verses. This “only day” is eternal; it is the everlasting Sabbath that Christ merited for His people and that, as the resurrected and glorified Christ, He has entered with them. This Christian dispensation is temporal; it will be terminated by the second coming of Christ. The expression “only day” as a sentence element of verses 6, 7 may best be clarified by a paraphrase of these verses as follows:

It will come to pass in that day—this Christian dispensation—that there will not be the precious light of this “only day,” everlasting Sabbath, eternal rest. In “that day” this Sabbath “only day” will be dim. This will be owing to the fact that in “that day,” this present dispensation, the precious or glorious ones—God’s believing people—will be dimmed as to their heavenly light by the issues of their sinful flesh. This light will not yet shine as it one day will when the Church is with Christ in glory. Hence, this “only day” will also be dim in “that day.” For seeing that this “only day” is the everlasting Sabbath as kept and lived by the believers, it follows that this “only day” can be no brighter than the believers are perfect. This “only day” therefore will not be day in “that day;” that is, it will not be clear as day; nor, on the other hand, will it be night, that is, total darkness; but it will be characterized by dimness as are the believers themselves. This glorious day, eternal Sabbath, is surely one, only. There is no day to be compared with it. It is known to Christ, seeing that He merited it by His death on the cross and is therefore its Lord. The dimness of this “only day” will surely end with His return. For then God’s people will appear with Him in glory. Then the righteousness of this “only day,” which is the righteousness of Christ and of His people, will go forth as brightness, and the salvation thereof as a lamp that burneth. 

And so it is plain that keeping this “only day” is to cease from sin and to yield oneself to Christ; it is to see all God’s marvelous works that He accomplished through Christ and to say from the heart: Behold, it is very good. And so it is also plain that the light of which these verses speak is not sun light, light physical, nor natural light, the light of unsanctified reason, hut true light, the light of life, the light of true knowledge of God, of righteousness and holiness. It is the light of the everlasting day, eternal Sabbath. It is the light that will shine in the new Jerusalem and with what saving and healing and beautifying effect is revealed in the vision of John. The great city descends out of heaven from God. It has the glory of God, for the tabernacle of God is with men, and He, himself, dwells with them, and they are His people. And He wipes away all tears from their eyes; and there is no more death there, nor sorrow, nor crying nor any more pain. And there is no more night there; and they need no candle, neither light of the sun, for the Lord giveth them light. 

It is to this light that the expressions occurring in these verses, “There is not the precious light,” and, “it will be light,” have reference. And so the darkness of which these verses speak is the darkness of sin, the night of the wrath of God and of the curse stalking the earth and of death and hell and the grave and all the nameless suffering of this present time. 

Once it was day and once it was light in the first paradise. The light shone there in the first man, created as he was in God’s image. Not that the light shone in him with a heavenly brightness. Surely no. It could not, seeing that, being of the earth, earthy, and as yet having no need of Christ as Savior, he was not seeing God in Christ’s face but only through the medium of this earthy. And through this medium God shone upon him and in his heart. And walking in the light, his fellowship was with God. For God is light and in Him there is no darkness at all. 

But the first man did not abide in the light, continue in the rest of that first day, the rest of creation. He subjected himself to sin, and the sun of righteousness went under, and the day was turned into night. Then God manifested Himself as Savior. He came with the promise of that only day. And the heirs of the promise were persuaded, and by faith they saw afar off the glimmering of that day and rejoiced. And hope made not ashamed. The promise was fulfilled by Christ in His blotting out by His death all the sins of the heirs, and in His being raised because of their justification, and exalted at the right hand of the throne. In Him the sun of righteousness rose never again to go down, seeing that He is the Mediator of an eternal covenant. The night is past; it is day. For as the Lord of the Sabbath He shines in the hearts of His own and lo, they are conformed according to His likeness. And their light shines. But the light is not clear. It is not day; it is not night. But at the time of the evening it will be light, gloriously light in the New Jerusalem, the Holy City. 

G.M.O.