We stated that the action of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States, in 1932, whereby the proposed Plan of Union was unanimously adopted, must be considered of principal importance. For, as fair as the Synod was concerned, the Reformed Church had simply shifted to the confessional basis of the Evangelical Synod of North America: the Augsburg Confession, Luther’s Catechism, and the Heidelberg Catechism.

However, we recall that this resolution and proposal was to be referred to the classes of the Reformed Church in the United States, and to the districts of the Evangelical Synod of North America, for their approval. It was, therefore, still possible that some classis, or group of classes, would reject the proposal, and protest -against the action taken by the General Synod.

As far as I can gather from the official documents, however, no such action was taken even by one classis.

On June 26, 1934, a joint session was held, in Cleveland, Ohio, of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America. To this session report was rendered by the two respective commissions on Church Union representing the two denominations. The commission of the Reformed Church, reported as follows:

“Dear Fathers and Brethren:

“The Evangelical Synod of North America and the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States having assembled in joint session in order to receive official and final report of the action of each Church on the Plan of Union, according to the provisions of Article XII, I beg leave to report for the Commission on Closer Relations and Church Union that the Reformed Church in the United States has regularly adopted the Plan of Union and the delegates of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States are prepared to declare by joint resolution that the union of the two Churches, is duly effected.”

“Respectfully submitted,

George W. Richards, Chairman”

The above is from the “Acts and Proceedings of the General Synod of The Evangelical and the Reformed Church, 1934,” as quoted in “An Examination and Criticism,” p. 90.

The commission representing the Evangelical Church presented a similar report.

After these reports, were adopted, a joint resolution was presented and adopted as follows:

“Whereas the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America) by regular action of the Districts and the General Conference of the Evangelical Synod of North America and of the General Synod and the Classes of the Reformed Church in the United States, have adopted the Plan of Union submitted to these bodies by the Commissions on Church Union,

“Be it resolved, first, that the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States and the General Conference of the Evangelical Synod of North America, in joint session assembled this day, June 26, 7 P.M., 1934, in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, hereby declare that the Plain of Union has been legally adopted;

“Second, that the union of the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America is now effected under the name of “The Evangelical and Reformed Church”;

“Third, that the consummation of the union be formally pronounced by the President of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States and the President of the Evangelical Synod of North America, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost;

“Fourth, that, pending the devotional services, this Joint Session be declared adjourned.” (idem, pp. 90, 91).

If this means anything, it implies that all the classes of the Reformed Church in the United States had adopted the Plan of Union, that they all declared that they were convinced that the two denominations involved were in agreement on essential doctrines, and that they all adopted the confessional standards of the Evangelical Synod of North America as the doctrinal basis of union.

I failed to find, in the official documents, a single protest by a single classis, or consistory, or officebearer, against this proposed Plan of Union.