All Articles For Rome and Politics

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: May 1, 2009, p. 352. Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions (1965) Given the Roman Church’s false ecumenism with the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, and Protestants, it is no surprise that it is engaged in syncretism with pagan religions.1 After all, Jehoshaphat’s false ecumenism with the apostate Northern Kingdom (II Chron. 18; 20:31-37) led him into syncretism with pagan Edom (II Kings 3). Rome has always been syncretistic to some degree. Witness its compromises in the conversion of the...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: January 15, 2009, p. 179. Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism (1964) is the Roman Catholic Church’s blueprint for restoring all professing Christians—especially the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, and Protestants—to the papal fold. This will also serve Rome’s geopolitical goals: one world, one religion, one pope. Early Protestant Ecumenism and the Edinburgh Missionary Conference The ecumenical movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries involved Protestants with various backgrounds (Presbyterian, Congregationalist, Baptist, Anglican, Methodist, Reformed, Lutheran, etc.) who were typically either Arminian or modernist (or...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: February 1, 2009, p. 206. Having considered Rome’s false ecumenism with Eastern Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, and Protestantism, as well as the principles of Roman ecumenism, it remains to examine the methods of its ecumenism. For this, the prime source is, once again, the Decree of Ecumenism (1964), produced by Rome’s last “ecumenical” council, Vatican II (1962-1965).1 Some examples shall also be given of the use of these methods (or weapons) in the slaughter of careless, apostatizing Protestants. Remember too that Rome’s labors to bring all...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: December 15, 2008, p. 138. Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism (1964) The most official, systematic, and widely accessible statement of the Roman Catholic Church’s false ecumenism is Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism (1964). The Latin name of this decree, Unitatis Redintegratio, is revealing, for it means “Restoration of Unity.” The unity the Roman Church wishes to see restored is that original oneness that it claims all professing Christians and churches had with the “Mother Church” (Rome) and the “Holy Father” (the pope).¹ This will also...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: October 15, 2008, p. 40. The Declaration on Religious Freedom (1965) According to Pope Paul VI (1963-1978), the Declaration on Religious Freedom, produced at Roman Catholicism’s Vatican II (1962-1965), is “one of the major texts of the Council.”¹ American Jesuit John Courtney Murray goes further: “the document is a significant event in the history of the Church” (p. 673).² Of all the 16 documents of Vatican II, the Declaration on Religious Freedom is the one that most clearly evinces the spirit of...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: December 1, 2008, p. 112. The Vatican The logical place to begin a discussion of the political power of the Roman Catholic Church today is, of course, the Vatican, a sovereign city-state within the city of Rome. Established in 1929, the Vatican City is the world’s smallest state, both by area (108.7 acres) and population (c. 800). Its citizenry is 100% Roman Catholic, its highest functionaries are Roman clergy, and its non-hereditary, elected monarch is the pope. Jesuit Thomas J. Reese mentions several...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: November 1, 2008, p. 55. Images from Rome’s Political History The Roman Church’s rise in, and exercise of, political power through the ages has been detailed in many books and could rightly merit a Standard Bearer article or two. For our purposes, though, we shall just mention some of the most outstanding instances and images, before moving on to Rome’s current policies. * Pope Leo I’s saving the city of Rome from Attila the Hun by his last-ditch mediation (452). * the...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. he key to understanding the political pretensions of the church of Rome lies in her understanding of herself as the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic church headed by the pope, who is not only the “Successor of Peter the Prince of the Apostles” and the “Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church” but also the “Vicar of Christ” and the “Holy Father.” Is not the triune God the absolute sovereign of the universe? Has not Christ been invested with all authority in heaven and in earth (Matt. 28:18)...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: September 1, 2009, p. 468. Players Malachi Martin in his entertaining, though somewhat long-winded, The Keys of This Blood (1990) claims, “we are all involved in an all-out, no-holds-barred, three-way global competition.”¹ The three contenders to establish the first ever one-world system of government are the communist Soviet Union, led by Mikhail Gorbachev; the democratic capitalists of the West, led by the US president; and the Roman Catholic Church, led by John Paul II. The “new world government,” with its “legislative, executive...

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