All Articles For Not Anabaptist But Reformed

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: March 1, 2009, p. 256. After Rev. Van Baalen has proven that we differ radically from the Anabaptists on the doctrine of grace, and thus, according to his own spoken judgment, his attempt to brand us as Anabaptistic has failed, failed completely, he comes at it from another side. Once again it must be chanted...

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: March 15, 2009, p. 285. This article concludes the series. Having come to the end of his pamphlet, Rev. VanBaalen thinks he must ask us several questions, which, it seems to him, call for resolution. Now we do not feel obligated to answer every question the brother thinks he must ask us. Moreover, we are...

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: January 15, 2009, p. 184. Except for the questions that Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen thinks he must put to us, and which, as he seems to think, must be resolved by us, the brother really concludes his pamphlet with a chapter that claims to demonstrate that our view is Anabaptistic. After all that we...

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a In the first half of this chapter, Danhof and Hoeksema have established that Rev. Van Baalen cites many texts but has almost no exegesis. Their exposition of Psalm 73 demonstrated that Scripture teaches the opposite of common grace. They ask Van Baalen to reconcile this and similar passages with his “idea that God is actually good to the reprobate.” They insist that this is the proper method of interpretation, that is, comparing Scripture with Scripture, and interpreting each text in the light of the whole...

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: July 2008, p. 427. [In the first part of this chapter, Herman Hoeksema and Henry Danhof have rejected Van Baalen’s assertion that they misuse the Reformed confessions. Jan Karel Van Baalen, they wrote, accused them of removing from the confession what they did not want, namely, the doctrine of common grace. On the contrary, the...

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* Not Anabaptist but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Commin Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: May 1, 2008, p. 324. Next Rev. Van Baalen devotes a chapter to the confessional side of the matter. We will respond accordingly. If the attempt made by the brother here should fail, then certainly his entire booklet will be a failure. And in fact both this chapter and the entire pamphlet are a failure,...

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In Institutes II.3.3, Calvin once again returns to this same subject. Here also it must be pointed out that he does not speak of these gifts as one of his most important doctrines. Just the opposite is true. This chapter deals with the fact that natural man can never produce anything other than what is damnable before God. But after Calvin has developed this very sharply and powerfully, he foresees a potential objection. And he goes into that objection. Some of the heathen have indeed been adorned with excellent gifts. And therefore the opinion is untenable that man’s nature is...

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* Not Anabaptist, But Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Co * Not Anabaptist, But Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: July 2007, p. 421. The first subject Rev. Van Baalen treats in his pamphlet is the Noahitic covenant. Or rather, the subject of the brother’s treatment is not that...

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* Not Anabaptist, but Reformed was a pamphlet written by Danhof and Hoeksema in 1923 as a “Provisional Response to Rev. Jan Karel Van Baalen Concerning the Denial of Common Grace.” Translated here from the Dutch by seminarian Daniel Holstege. Previous article in this series: February 15, 2008, p. 223. As Rev. Van Baalen next proceeds to judge our view in the light of Reformed theology, he says first of all that he will limit himself to Reformed theologians of the last half century. The reason that he gives for this is that we are dealing here “with an immense...

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A Word to Our Churches¹  The conflict in our churches is gradually focusing on the subject of grace, and especially on what bears the name “common grace” among us. This has been expected for a long time already. The controversy in our midst has actually focused on this point already for a long time, and we do not hesitate now to add that, in principle, the struggle of the last few years has always concerned this matter. On the one hand, there was a group which more and more emphasized the importance of the doctrine of common grace. They were...

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