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The Church and the Sacraments. The Time of the Reformation Views on the Church. Formal Principle (cont’d). The Reformation Versus False Mysticism.

4.  The doctrine of the merit of good works as taught by Romanists is another most prolific error. They hold that works done after regeneration have real merit (meritum condigni), and that they are the ground of the sinner’s justification before God. They hold that a man may do more…

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The Church and the Sacraments. The Time of the Reformation Views on the Church. Formal Principle (cont’d)

Rome, therefore, contends that the Church, as an external and visible society, consisting of those who profess the Christian religion, united in communion of the same sacra­ments and subjection to lawful pastors, and especially to the Pope of Rome, is divinely appointed to be the infallible teacher of men in…

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The Church and the Sacraments, Early Views Of The Church (Cont’d). Bishops and Bishop of Rome – Its Historical Background.

This is indeed a most interesting subject. We can distinguish, as far as the government of the Church is concerned, between the episcopal and Presbyterian forms of church government. Incidentally, we have the Presbyterian form of church government. It is surely worthy of note that the episcopal form of church…

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The Church and the Sacraments, Early Views Of The Sacrament Of Baptism. A Few General Observations (cont’d). The Significance of Baptism.

A Few General Observations (cont’d) In our preceding article we remarked that, beginning a series of articles on the “early views of the sacrament of baptism” we thought it not amiss to call attention to the washings and purifications in Israel in the Old Testament. We also called attention to…

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The Church and the Sacraments, Views During the Third Period (750-1517 A.D.), The Supremacy of the Pope, Gregory the Great (590-604)

When Eulogius (in our preceding article we were quoting from Philip Schaff to the effect that Gregory displayed in his correspondence with his rival a singular combination of pride and humility—H.V.), in return for his exaltation of his own see, afterwards addressed Gregory as “universal pope,” he strongly repudiated the…

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