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The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower.

Psalm 18:2

This is a very important Psalm. The Holy Spirit had already said the same thing in II Samuel 22. Surely, when the Holy Spirit repeats a word of God we know that He wishes to emphasize a truth.

These words were written and sung at a very important juncture in the life of David the servant of God. The time was near the close of his life, a life that for the most part was a life of war. David composed this Psalm after he had victory over all his enemies, even over his most bitter enemy, Saul. So at the end of his life he turns to God in praise and adoration and says, “I love thee,” and then gives his reasons, which compose the rest of the Psalm.

David was a humble man. That is why he is called a man after God’s own heart. He was king at a time when kings did whatever they pleased. Yet he humbly confesses that God alone gave him the victory. There is nothing that he reserves for himself. It was not David; it was God.

Thus this Psalm is also Messianic. David is Christ, and Saul is the devil, and all his enemies are the hosts of hell that set themselves against the Lord and His anointed. This word of God was given to us to confess because Jesus Christ lives within the church.

A rock! In nature it has a strange and tremendous speech. It is a speech of power and strength, stability and endurance, whether that is on the dry land, in the mountain ranges, or at the edge of the sea. Caesar looked upon the rock of Gibraltar, and now twenty centuries later we can do the same. More than likely it will still be there when Christ returns.

A strange speech. The Bible says its works are perfect. It just stands there. There are many powers, mighty creatures, and great elements, but the rock just stands there. It does not say anything; it does not do anything; nor does it move. It stands stock still. The stiller it stands, the more it deserves the name of rock. It is its very nature to stand still. Tons and tons of water that sweep away everything in its path are broken asunder when they hit a rock. A huge oil tanker weighing many tons, combined with its speed, advances upon a rock. There is a terrible impact. You know the result. The rock stands, but the ship is gone, broken and crushed. The rock is a speech of strength, stability, immovability, and endurance.

No wonder the rock is often chosen for a high tower and a refuge. It serves as a foundation, so that men may dwell safely. The rock in nature spells safety from tornadoes, storms, winds, and floods. None prevail against it; the rock stands.

No wonder that God is likened to a rock. In relation to God, it speaks of strength, might, and terrific power. God is the Rock; He is the Almighty. He has all the power from everlasting to everlasting. There is no power outside of Him. His work is perfect. He does not need to labor and hurry; to start, fail, and start again. He is the immovable, always perfect Rock.

It speaks also of endurance. As the rock in nature, there is in Him no shadow of turning. From as far back in eternity as you can imagine, to as far as you can imagine in the future, He is always the Rock, always standing, always perfect.

He is the Rock in all His adorable virtues—in His love, in His wisdom, and in all His wonders and praises. Whatever virtue of love, goodness, and might that you find in this world is not of this world, but is a manifestation of Him, the Rock. He reveals Himself as such to His people.

We find this revelation in His Word: “The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with loving-kindness have I drawn thee” (Jer. 31:3). This word you will find on every page in the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation— “I have loved thee with an everlasting love.” When that word of God is revealed to your heart by the Spirit of Christ, then your first reaction is, “I will love thee with my whole heart, mind, soul, and strength,” just as David did in this Psalm. God has always revealed that He has a chosen people, engraved in the palms of His hand. This is a certain number, which cannot be increased or decreased. This people has all the love of His heart.

In the beginning, at the time of the creation, God gave Adam and Eve their being in that wondrous garden of Eden, the garden of delight. This was the first manifestation in history of His eternal love. But then the whole world sank into darkness. His beloved church, Adam and Eve, fell into sin and corruption. Instead of looking into the eyes of Jehovah, they turned their backs to Him and sought the devil. Yet God is the Rock, and His eternal love is, humanly speaking, tested. He revealed that love in the test, that He is yet the Rock.

In this we are confronted with two difficulties. First, how can Jehovah God take His church to His bosom? That is impossible because of His righteousness and justice, which demand that His church go to hell. Secondly, how shall that church go to heaven, when she is the enemy of God? The church shakes its fist at God and says, “We will not that Thou be King over us.” By nature we would sooner serve the devil.

The revelation of His love is in Christ Jesus. Isaiah 64:5 speaks of these realities. “Behold, thou art wroth; for we have sinned.” And then, “in those is continuance, and we shall be saved.” The church lies in darkness and is the enemy of God. He is wroth with them for that sin. Now in these, that is, in the wrath and in our sins, eternity enters. That means that the eternal, covenant Jehovah enters our sins and enters into His wrath. This is Golgotha—Jesus. This is Jesus entering our sins, penetrating our guilt, uniting Himself with our sins and guilt so intimately that when Jesus hangs on the cross God beholds in Him all the sins of His church. That is the revelation of the Rock of our salvation.

God enters His own wrath in the Redeemer Jesus Christ. There is the Rock of Ages on the cross, and all the waves of God’s wrath pass over Him. A great storm passes upon that Rock, who is the substitute for the church. When the storm is over, there is the dawning of day, no more sin and condemnation. The Rock has exhausted the wrath of God, and there is nothing left but sunlight and warmth and the cherishing heart of Jehovah for the whole of the church in Christ.

That has its own effect. We make a personal confession. We say, He is my rock. It is the expression of love for God that the church has as she gazes upon that Rock and its perfect work of salvation. That is the reaction throughout all history. It was the reaction already of Adam and Eve, at the dawn of history, when men began to call upon the name of God. So also the whole church, when she surveys that wondrous cross, cries, “O my God,” with her whole heart, mind, soul, and strength.

We partake of that Rock. This is seen in Scripture in Isaiah 51:1: “Hearken to me, ye that follow after righteousness, ye that seek the Lord: look unto the rock whence ye are hewn, and to the hole of the pit whence ye are digged.” In Deuteronomy 32:18 is recorded, “Of the Rock that begat thee thou art unmindful, and hast forgotten God that formed thee.” That is regeneration. When we are begotten of the Rock, part of that Rock enters us. The Rock-like quality of that new life enters us. This we call repentance, the power to know and see the Kingdom of God, the knowledge of God and Christ, eternal life.

This creates a life of sanctity, and certainly of perseverance. Each child of God becomes so much like the Rock that he will never forsake it. He says, “Take the whole world, my wife, my child, my life, my everything, but I will never forsake the Rock.”

The conclusion of the whole matter is, “In Him will I trust.” When you experience the Rock, you also say that He is your fortress, He is your deliverer, He is your strength, He is your buckler, your shield, and the horn of your salvation.

What does it mean to trust in that Rock? The answer is in Matthew 7 at the end of the sermon on the mount. “Therefore, whosoever heareth these sayings of mine and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man which built his house upon a rock.” The other side of the coin is, “And everyone that heareth these sayings of mine and doeth them not is likened unto a foolish man which built his house upon the sand.”

We are all building a house, whether we are elect or reprobate. At the end of time the Rock will come and as such: “The rain descended, the floods came and the wind blew and beat against that house.” We know the end: the first house stood; the second did not. So we must go on building on the Rock. If we do not, then our houses will not stand, for they are built on nothing less than sinking sand.

Let us put our trust in Jehovah, the Rock, and we will persevere to the end in Christ Jesus.

 

The Lord is my rock, and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, and my high tower.

Psalm 18:2

This is a very important Psalm. The Holy Spirit had already said the same thing in II Samuel 22. Surely, when the Holy Spirit repeats a word of God we know that He wishes to emphasize a truth.

These words were written and sung at a very important juncture in the life of David the servant of God. The time was near the close of his life, a life that for the most part was a life of war. David composed this Psalm after he had victory over all his enemies, even over his most bitter enemy, Saul. So at the end of his life he turns to God in praise and adoration and says, “I love thee,” and then gives his reasons, which compose the rest of the Psalm.

David was a humble man. That is why he is called a man after God’s own heart. He was king at a time when kings did whatever they pleased. Yet he humbly confesses that God alone gave him the victory. There is nothing that he reserves for himself. It was not David; it was God.

Thus this Psalm is also Messianic. David is Christ, and Saul is the devil, and all his enemies are the hosts of hell that set themselves against the Lord and His anointed. This word of God was given to us to confess because Jesus Christ lives within the church.

A rock! In nature it has a strange and tremendous speech. It is a speech of power and strength, stability and endurance, whether that is on the dry land, in the mountain ranges, or at the edge of the sea. Caesar looked upon the rock of Gibraltar, and now twenty centuries later we can do the same. More than likely it will still be there when Christ returns.

A strange speech. The Bible says its works are perfect. It just stands there. There are many powers, mighty creatures, and great elements, but the rock just stands there. It does not say anything; it does not do anything; nor does it move. It stands stock still. The stiller it stands, the more it deserves the name of rock. It is its very nature to stand still. Tons and tons of water that sweep away everything in its path are broken asunder when they hit a rock. A huge oil tanker weighing many tons, combined with its speed, advances upon a rock. There is a terrible impact. You know the result. The rock stands, but the ship is gone, broken and crushed. The rock is a speech of strength, stability, immovability, and endurance.

No wonder the rock is often chosen for a high tower and a refuge. It serves as a foundation, so that men may dwell safely. The rock in nature spells safety from tornadoes, storms, winds, and floods. None prevail against it; the rock stands.

No wonder that God is likened to a rock. In relation to God, it speaks of strength, might, and terrific power. God is the Rock; He is the Almighty. He has all the power from everlasting to everlasting. There is no power outside of Him. His work is perfect. He does not need to labor and hurry; to start, fail, and start again. He is the immovable, always perfect Rock.

It speaks also of endurance. As the rock in nature, there is in Him no shadow of turning. From as far back in eternity as you can imagine, to as far as you can imagine in the future, He is always the Rock, always standing, always perfect.

He is the Rock in all His adorable virtues—in His love, in His wisdom, and in all His wonders and praises. Whatever virtue of love, goodness, and might that you find in this world is not of this world, but is a manifestation of Him, the Rock. He reveals Himself as such to His people.

We find this revelation in His Word: “The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with loving-kindness have I drawn thee” (Jer. 31:3). This word you will find on every page in the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation— “I have loved thee with an everlasting love.” When that word of God is revealed to your heart by the Spirit of Christ, then your first reaction is, “I will love thee with my whole heart, mind, soul, and strength,” just as David did in this Psalm. God has always revealed that He has a chosen people, engraved in the palms of His hand. This is a certain number, which cannot be increased or decreased. This people has all the love of His heart.

In the beginning, at the time of the creation, God gave Adam and Eve their being in that wondrous garden of Eden, the garden of delight. This was the first manifestation in history of His eternal love. But then the whole world sank into darkness. His beloved church, Adam and Eve, fell into sin and corruption. Instead of looking into the eyes of Jehovah, they turned their backs to Him and sought the devil. Yet God is the Rock, and His eternal love is, humanly speaking, tested. He revealed that love in the test, that He is yet the Rock.

In this we are confronted with two difficulties. First, how can Jehovah God take His church to His bosom? That is impossible because of His righteousness and justice, which demand that His church go to hell. Secondly, how shall that church go to heaven, when she is the enemy of God? The church shakes its fist at God and says, “We will not that Thou be King over us.” By nature we would sooner serve the devil.

The revelation of His love is in Christ Jesus. Isaiah 64:5 speaks of these realities. “Behold, thou art wroth; for we have sinned.” And then, “in those is continuance, and we shall be saved.” The church lies in darkness and is the enemy of God. He is wroth with them for that sin. Now in these, that is, in the wrath and in our sins, eternity enters. That means that the eternal, covenant Jehovah enters our sins and enters into His wrath. This is Golgotha—Jesus. This is Jesus entering our sins, penetrating our guilt, uniting Himself with our sins and guilt so intimately that when Jesus hangs on the cross God beholds in Him all the sins of His church. That is the revelation of the Rock of our salvation.

God enters His own wrath in the Redeemer Jesus Christ. There is the Rock of Ages on the cross, and all the waves of God’s wrath pass over Him. A great storm passes upon that Rock, who is the substitute for the church. When the storm is over, there is the dawning of day, no more sin and condemnation. The Rock has exhausted the wrath of God, and there is nothing left but sunlight and warmth and the cherishing heart of Jehovah for the whole of the church in Christ.

That has its own effect. We make a personal confession. We say, He is my rock. It is the expression of love for God that the church has as she gazes upon that Rock and its perfect work of salvation. That is the reaction throughout all history. It was the reaction already of Adam and Eve, at the dawn of history, when men began to call upon the name of God. So also the whole church, when she surveys that wondrous cross, cries, “O my God,” with her whole heart, mind, soul, and strength.

We partake of that Rock. This is seen in Scripture in Isaiah 51:1: “Hearken to me, ye that follow after righteousness, ye that seek the Lord: look unto the rock whence ye are hewn, and to the hole of the pit whence ye are digged.” In Deuteronomy 32:18 is recorded, “Of the Rock that begat thee thou art unmindful, and hast forgotten God that formed thee.” That is regeneration. When we are begotten of the Rock, part of that Rock enters us. The Rock-like quality of that new life enters us. This we call repentance, the power to know and see the Kingdom of God, the knowledge of God and Christ, eternal life.

This creates a life of sanctity, and certainly of perseverance. Each child of God becomes so much like the Rock that he will never forsake it. He says, “Take the whole world, my wife, my child, my life, my everything, but I will never forsake the Rock.”

The conclusion of the whole matter is, “In Him will I trust.” When you experience the Rock, you also say that He is your fortress, He is your deliverer, He is your strength, He is your buckler, your shield, and the horn of your salvation.

What does it mean to trust in that Rock? The answer is in Matthew 7 at the end of the sermon on the mount. “Therefore, whosoever heareth these sayings of mine and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man which built his house upon a rock.” The other side of the coin is, “And everyone that heareth these sayings of mine and doeth them not is likened unto a foolish man which built his house upon the sand.”

We are all building a house, whether we are elect or reprobate. At the end of time the Rock will come and as such: “The rain descended, the floods came and the wind blew and beat against that house.” We know the end: the first house stood; the second did not. So we must go on building on the Rock. If we do not, then our houses will not stand, for they are built on nothing less than sinking sand.

Let us put our trust in Jehovah, the Rock, and we will persevere to the end in Christ Jesus.

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