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An excellent way to make sure that many of our people know about our publications is to display them. In early August, First Protestant Reformed Church in Holland, Michigan put up a new display rack in the hall. Their bulletin reads, “The Evangelism Committee has placed a display of RFPA publications as well as many pamphlets in this rack in order that the congregation and those who visit us have easy access to these excellent publications.” The display of books was made possible because there was someone in the church who was willing to handle the purchasing of books. An added advantage is that our publications are seen by the youth of our churches who will later on be forming families of their own. 

A Bible study group at Hope Protestant Reformed Church has recently begun studying the history of our churches. They meet every Monday night and are led by Prof. H. Hanko. The first lesson studied the background of the common grace controversy, beginning with the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, 1834, and proceeding up to the Christian Reformed Church in 1924. Their second lesson will be on the first point of common grace. It is good to see that many of our young adults are keenly interested in knowing not only our doctrines but also the history surrounding some of these doctrines. 

Our Hope Protestant Reformed Church in Redlands, California is celebrating their 50th Anniversary a year late. Hope Church was organized in 1932 with thirty-five families. There are presently forty-two families. The reason for this seemingly unexplainable event is that their new church building will be finished in 1983 and they thought it a good idea to combine the celebrations into one event. If you are over in the Redlands area in either the end of May or the beginning of September you will have the privilege of being a part of their celebration. I also understand that they had a good response in regards to the solicitation of loans for the new building. These are good evidences that God maintains a spirit of unity in our churches. 

At the end of the last issue, I briefly remarked about the progress Covenant Protestant Reformed Church has made towards a new building. I have an up-to-date report for you. “We are happy to be able to report (that) the electrician has finished his work except for the final installation of light fixtures. . . .we have had one contractor at the building to bid on the heating and duct-work.” They are also investigating the possibility of holding regular worship services in the new building before the parking lot is paved. May God grant that possibility to our brethren in New Jersey. 

As you know, First Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids has been working hard to sell their church property. At their recent congregational meeting they, made the following decision: “The extension of time for the closing of the sale of our church property was granted.” 

There is another church building item that has come to my attention from Hudsonville Protestant Reformed Church’s bulletin. “One additional proposal the consistory presents for this meeting: the installation of ceiling fans in the auditorium and fellowship hall.” This was approved. Not only do the ceiling fans provide better air circulation but also the “savings in fuel costs would equal the cost of the fans within four years.” I must admit that some of our churches do get stuffy in the winter and hot in the summer. 

A group of people from Kalamazoo and the Grand Rapids area are working together under the leadership of Rev. Woudenberg to lay tentative plans for a “Child Development Day.” So far the group has met twice and plans on this special event taking place in the spring. You will want to keep your ears open for further developments. 

—DH