All Articles For Vol 93 Issue 02 10/15/2016

Results 1 to 9 of 9

As part of this special Standard Bearer issue on Martin Luther, I was asked to submit an article featuring some of the classic works on Luther as well as some of the new works being produced in connection with next year’s 500th anniversary of Luther’s posting of the Ninety-five Theses. It is not difficult to feature books on Luther. The difficulty is in knowing where to end the list. There is, indeed, a plethora of good ones. But we can and will highlight a few of the best for you here, so that you can begin or continue to do...

Continue reading

Reformed ecclesiology (doctrine of the church) treats the following topics: the nature of the church, the gathering of the church, the attributes and marks of the church, the power and government of the church, and the means of grace of the church. In his ecclesiology, Luther disagreed with the other Reformers on some matters (especially on the sacraments), but in the main points there is considerable unity. Luther was not a systematizer of doctrine. Unlike Calvin, he did not write an Institutes of the Christian Religion or his own dogmatics. Many of his works are polemical, written in the heat...

Continue reading

Martin Luther would be unknown to us if it were not for Scripture. The Spirit did not write the name “Martin Luther” in Scripture as He did the name “Moses” or “Malachi.” But the Spirit wrote the Scriptures in Martin Luther, giving to him the convictions that made him the historical giant that he was, and propelling him into the spotlight of the ecclesiastical and national scene in sixteenth-century Germany. Without Scripture and the profound impact it had on his life, Martin Luther was just another man that time, like an ever-rolling stream, would silently bear away. Sure, he was...

Continue reading

God in His wise and wonderful providence raises up special men and women for His church in special times. One such man was Martin Luther, as we well know. What was special about Luther was not just his intellectual gifts and abilities, though they were outstanding, but also his acute spiritual sensitivities. Luther was a man through whom emotions rolled like great tsunamis at times, but emotions that were tied to an overwhelming God-consciousness, an awareness that afflicted his conscience in his early life to the point of despair again and again. Was there no way out for a damn-worthy...

Continue reading

More than anything else, what do we need in order to live happily in this world and to die in peace? Is it not the certain knowledge that our many sins, which are so great and terrible, are forgiven by God because of the death of Christ? Is it not the assurance that after this life we will go to be with Christ because not even death can separate us from His love? All who receive this gospel of salvation through Christ by a true faith have joy and comfort in life and in death. This gospel of the glory...

Continue reading

Young Luther Martin Luther’s father, Hans Luther, had designs for his son to become a lawyer, but God had determined otherwise. “There are many devices in a man’s heart; nevertheless the counsel of the Lord, that shall stand” (Prov. 19:21). As is said, “Man proposes, but God disposes.” Hans Luther devised son Martin’s way, but “the Lord directed his steps” (Prov. 16:9), first into the monastery, then into the university and seminary. In the end, Luther’s lifelong occupation was, as we would call it, seminary professor. By God’s design. Because Hans Luther was a poor man, son Martin’s life began...

Continue reading

On October 31, 1517, in the not-yet-famous city of Wittenberg, a gifted but largely unknown monk nailed to the door of the church a placard. The placard contained a long list of assertions—ninety-five, to be exact. The monk/priest posted them for the purpose of provoking debate—he declared himself willing publicly to debate any of the statements the next day. His heart was stirred out of concern for his flock, and it smoldered with anger against the sale of indulgences in his parish. Members of his own congregation, coming to confess their sins, insisted that there was no need for them...

Continue reading

After Darkness, Light Last year’s special issue of the Standard Bearer treated a number of key figures and movements that the Lord used to preserve His church and truth in the darkness of the Middle Ages. This year, our special Reformation issue treats Martin Luther and the Reformation God began through him. The light of biblical truth began to shine again through the writings and preaching of God’s servants such as Luther because Luther was “convicted by Scripture.” “After darkness, light” is the translation of the Latin phrase, Post tenebras lux. It comes from the old Latin translation of Job...

Continue reading

* Taken from Commentary on Galatians, © Copyright 1979, by Martin Luther, 84-87. Published by Kregel Publications, Grand Rapids, MI. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.  “For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God.” Galatians 2:19 It is necessary that we be well instructed to understand the difference between the righteousness of the law and grace. The righteousness of grace doth in nowise pertain to the flesh. For the flesh may not be at liberty, but must remain in the grave, the prison, the couch: it must be in...

Continue reading