All Articles For Vol 92 Issue 03 11/1/2015

Results 1 to 10 of 11

On September 30, 2015, Classis West held its fall meeting in Edgerton, MN. The meeting was preceded by an officebearers’ conference the previous day on the topic “The Local Church and Missions.” In his keynote speech, Rev. J. Slopsema emphasized first that every local church has the calling before God to do mission work. The church should not think this is optional for her; she also should view it as a privilege, not a burden. The second part of his speech explained that some of the work of missions becomes the work of the denomination, and laid out guidelines for...

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The Waldenses were living proof that Christ has never been without His true church, not even in the Middle Ages, when the church institute was apostate and corrupt beyond description. In every age Christ builds His church and keeps His own. The ‘sect’ known as the Waldenses are proof of this truth. We generally associate the Waldenses with the great slaughter of these humble believers that took place in the Alpine valleys that lie on the border between France and Italy, a slaughter that began on April 24, 1655 and continued for many days. On that fateful Saturday, a day...

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As his name would indicate, Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples (c. 1455-1536) was a Frenchman from Étaples, a coastal town south of Calais, in Picardy. His surname is sometimes given as Fabry or Fabri, and he is also known by the Latin form of his name: Jacobus Faber Stapulensis. Although this sounds complicated, it is worth bearing in mind if you look him up online or in books and articles dealing with the Reformation, along with the men and ideas that prepared the way for it. Unlike the other individuals treated in this special Reformation Day issue of the SB, Jacques Lefèvre...

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We are sometimes inclined to think of the Protestant Reformation as something that came out of nowhere. However, long before Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-five theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, there were already men whom God was using to prepare the way. One of those men was John Wycliffe. Another was John Huss. Who was John Huss? (Also referred to as Jan Hus.) John Huss was a man of God. John Huss was a preacher. And John Huss was a man who paid the ultimate sacrifice for confessing the truths of the gospel. And, in...

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We are sometimes inclined to think of the Protestant Reformation as something that came out of nowhere. However, long before Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-five theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, there were already men whom God was using to prepare the way. One of those men was John Wycliffe. Another was John Huss. Who was John Huss? (Also referred to as Jan Hus.) John Huss was a man of God. John Huss was a preacher. And John Huss was a man who paid the ultimate sacrifice for confessing the truths of the gospel. And, in...

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Not least art thou, thou little Bethlehem In Judah, for in thee the Lord was born; Nor thou in Britain, little Lutterworth, Least, for in thee the word was born again. Alfred Tennyson, “Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham” (1880) This verse, penned by the famed Alfred Lord Tennyson, captures the significance of the “Gospel Doctor,” John Wycliffe, and one of his most important contributions to the church. Just as it was in a little village in Judea that the eternal Word became flesh, so also was it in a small town in England (Lutterworth) that Wycliffe and his followers produced...

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It is always a wonderful thing to find another who loves the sovereignty of God as the truth of God revealed in Scripture. It is especially wonderful to find such in the Middle Ages. Thomas Bradwardine, though little known, is such a man. If Gottschalk is rightly remembered in particular for his defense of sovereign predestination in the Middle Ages, Bradwardine ought to be remembered for his defense of the absolute sovereignty of God during the same era.1 Bradwardine was born in England sometime around AD 1290. He was a brilliant man, earning him the nickname “The Profound Doctor.” He...

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The Man Gottschalk’s name means “Servant of God,” and as a servant of God’s truth he lived and died. To suffer as he did for the doctrine of sovereign double predestination, he had not only in name but also in heart to be God’s servant. Born around 803,1 Gottschalk anticipated Calvin’s teaching by 750 years with his emphasis on the doctrines we know as limited atonement and double predestination. He also, though not alone, believed a symbolic or figurative presence of Christ in the Lord’s Supper, a view that would be lost in Romish theology and would only be revived...

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Since this issue of the Standard Bearer concerns itself with church reformers in the medieval church, it will be helpful to gather a bit of information about the period. The Middle Ages covers the period from Pope Gregory I (AD 590) to the Reformation (AD 1517). Let us recall the character of this age. This era is often described as the dark ages due to the decline in education and culture. While it is true that education and the knowledge of the classics declined considerably, it is also true that the church maintained schools throughout this period. Universities also trace their beginning to the...

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What comes to mind with the term “Middle Ages”? Perhaps dark and dreary lives. Perhaps castles and knights. Perhaps crusades. For church history, what may come to mind is a seemingly endless parade of corrupt popes. Surely all Reformed readers think of the apostasy and corruption in the church that required the most significant Reformation the church has ever had—1517, and Martin Luther. There is, however, more to the Middle Ages than immediately meets the eye. The goal of this special issue is to introduce some key church figures of the Middle Ages. Though the age was indeed one of...

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