All Articles For Vol 88 Issue 04 11/15/2011

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Mission Activities We include here a recent update sent to our churches from Rev. and Mrs. Kleyn in the Philippines. “Recently two typhoons hit northern Luzon (Manila is in central to south Luzon), causing much flooding and damage to crops. Typhoon Pedring (international name, Nesat) came on September 27 and Typhoon Quiel (international name, Nalgae) just a few days later on October 1. In Manila we received a lot of rain, but nothing like they had further north. On our drive to Gabaldon this past weekend (October 8), we saw much evidence of the damage done to trees, roads, homes,...

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Previous article in this series: October 1, 2011, p. 17. O come, let us sing unto the Lord: let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms. For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. In his hand are the deep places of the earth: the strength of the hills is his also. The sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land. O come, let us worship and...

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Mission work is done in foreign lands with the goal of gathering the elect of God out of the nations of the earth. This is accomplished through faithful preaching of the gospel. The Spirit of Christ works mightily through this to bring the elect to a saving faith in Jesus Christ. But that in itself is not enough. In addition to the salvation of the elect, the goal of missions is also to gather God’s people together into congregations, for outside the instituted church there is no salvation (Belgic Confession of Faith, Art. 28). Churches must be organized. Congregations must...

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Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 11 Question 29. Why is the Son of God called Jesus, that is, a Savior? Answer. Because He saveth us, and delivereth us from our sins; and likewise, because we ought not to seek, neither can find salvation in any other. Question 30. Do such then believe in Jesus the only Savior, who seek their salvation and welfare of saints, of themselves, or anywhere else? Answer. They do not; for though they boast of Him in words, yet in deeds they deny Jesus the only deliverer and Savior; for one of these two things must be...

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Previous article in this series: September 15, 2011, p. 487. Man by nature has an evil desire to blame God for his own wickedness. A married man, for example, who openly and unashamedly enjoys lusting after other women, might say to someone who objects, “I cannot deny the way the good Lord made me.” Over against such vile statements we must confess that man was not a fornicator when God created him. Rather, God created man good. Man was without sin at the beginning, yet it was possible for him to disobey God. At first he did not have an...

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An August 5, 2011 British Broadcast Company (BBC) article entitled “Dutch rethink Christianity for a doubtful world” reports the shameful apostasy of “the mainstream Protestant Church in the Netherlands.”1 A merger with two other denominations took place in 2003, but the PKN is basically the old state church in the Netherlands. It is a denomination with a long history of apostasy. By 1834 it so manifested the marks of a false church (particularly by placing the faithful Reformed preacher Hendrik De Cock under discipline and deposing him unjustly from the ministry) that many left the denomination in a reformation movement...

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Not everyone can pray. Nor is every prayer heard (Is. 1:15). Prayer is a distinctly holy and covenantal activity. Prayer is that act of faith whereby a child of God communicates with his covenant Lord, worships Him, petitions Him for what he needs, and thanks Him for what he receives. Prayer and thanksgiving are friends. One cannot pray without thanks, for God gives His grace and Holy Spirit to those only who are continually thankful for them (L.D. 45). Nor can one give thanks without prayer, for it is the chief part of thankfulness. But prayer is not chiefly giving...

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2011, p. 464. In light of these basic elements of postmillennial eschatology, Reformed amillennialism renders its critique of postmillennialism. The critique applies to both the Puritan and the Christian Reconstruction forms of postmillennialism. This critique does not merely fault postmillennialism for a few, minor mistakes. Rather, it judges postmillennialism to be grievous error concerning the important biblical doctrine of the last things. The practical consequences of the error both for the church and for the Christian are injurious. The right Reformed critique of postmillennialism will certainly not recognize postmillennialism as a legitimate eschatological...

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Previous article in this series: November 1, 2011, p. 52. At the conclusion of our last article we stated that Harold Camping’s foolish date setting was not the worst of his evils, serious though that was and is. There are others even worse. Before enumerating some of these evils, we would set forth what we consider to be the central evil of which Harold Camping has become guilty, namely, the devilish mischief of working to sever believers from the church of the past, or, if you will, from the “Church of All Ages,” with her rich heritage. This is but...

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“For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving: for it is sanctified by the word of God and prayer.” I Timothy 4:4, 5 The relatively new Christians at Ephesus, where Timothy was serving as pastor, faced various errors. The devil is always attacking and seeking to divide! And he likes to make sinful extremes very appealing and seem so right. He has special delight in disturbing those who are young in the faith—such as were the saints at Ephesus. But thanks be to God for using these efforts of the...

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