All Articles For Vol 84 Issue 02 10/15/2007

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Prof. Cammenga is professor of Dogmatics and Old Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Church reformation ordinarily involves a return not only to true doctrine, but also to biblical church government. These two, it seems, almost always go hand in hand. Corresponding to departures in doctrine within the church are invariably departures also in the area of church polity. Often the errors in the government of the church serve the promotion of the errors in doctrine, countenancing the doctrinal deviations and protecting those who are promoting them. When reformation takes place, therefore, not only must the truth be restored, but...

Continue reading

Rev. Key is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hull, Iowa. The history of Christian education in the Netherlands is a long history. Prior to the Afscheiding  The Reformation, beginning already with Martin Luther, called for and established schools where the foundation would be the teachings of Holy Scripture. The Dutch Reformed gave the same emphasis to Christian education as early as 1574, when a Reformed synod called on preachers to see to it that there were good Christian schoolmasters.¹ But while the schools in the Netherlands—government schools—once had significant Christian content in their instruction, this was no longer the...

Continue reading

Prof. Gritters is professor of Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. The Protestant Reformed Churches are a Psalm-singing denomination. They sing Psalms in worship—and little else. The families sing Psalms (as well as good hymns) in their homes—many Psalms. Their children are taught the Psalms in the Christian schools—where Psalms have pride of place. The PRC are gladly Psalm-singing churches. They understand what an old preacher meant when, praising the Psalms, he said: “David has for ages subdued more hearts with his harp than ever with his sword and scepter.” And they believe that one of the instruments God uses to...

Continue reading

Prof. Hanko is professor emeritus of Church History and New Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary.   Introduction The Afscheiding (Secession) of 1834 was a true reformation of the church. It was a work of God through the Spirit of the exalted Christ by which the true church of Christ was delivered from the apostate state church (Hervormde Kerk). The Afscheiding is, therefore, part of the history of the Protestant Reformed Churches. That the Afscheiding was a true reformation of the church does not mean that there were no problems, differences, divisions, or disagreements among the many people and leaders who left the state church and...

Continue reading

Prof. Engelsma is professor of Dogmatics and Old Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. At the beginning of that reformation in the Netherlands, the fathers of the Secession of 1834—Hendrik deCock, Simon VanVelzen, Anthony Brummelkamp, and perhaps others— were agreed that election governs the covenant of grace. They differed in other respects, especially whether children of unbelieving members of the congregation should be baptized and concerning the meaning of the phrase “sanctified in Christ” in the first question of the Baptism form. But with one voice they confessed that election determines the covenant promise, covenant membership, the enjoyment of covenant...

Continue reading

* This translation by Homer C. Hoeksema appeared originally in the February 15, 1984 issue of the Standard Bearer, p. 211. We the undersigned, Overseers and members of the Reformed Congregation of Jesus Christ at Ulrum, having observed for a considerable time the corruption in the Netherlands Reformed Church (Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk), as well in the mutilation or denial of the doctrine of our fathers, based on God’s Word, as in the degeneration of the administration of the Holy Sacraments, according to the regulation of Christ in His Word, and in the almost complete neglect of ecclesiastical discipline; all of which...

Continue reading

Rev. Hanko is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Lynden, Washington.   Introduction  The Afscheiding, or “Secession,” that took place in Holland in 1834, when a large group of dissenters separated from the state church, is a movement that had a profound impact on the history of Reformed churches, including that of the Protestant Reformed Churches. The historical roots of the Christian Reformed Church and of the Protestant Reformed Churches are in that Secession. The Dutch immigrants who first formed the Christian Reformed Church and then the Protestant Reformed Churches were almost all from the Secession.¹ Herman Hoeksema and George...

Continue reading

Prof. Dykstra is professor of Church History and New Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. The Reformed believer esteems highly the unity of the church. “I believe an holy, catholic church,” we confess. The Reformed church rightly condemns schism—division in the church body. The form for adult baptism demands that members reject all heresies and schisms repugnant to the doctrines they confess. Upon the Reformed minister is laid a greater responsibility—he mustrefute all schisms and heresies repugnant to pure doctrine (Formula of Subscription). One of the gross sins for which an officebearer is suspended and deposed is the sin of public schism (Church...

Continue reading

Rev. Simon VanVelzen (a “Father of the Secession” of 1834)¹ The great multitude of mankind does not work for the food that endures unto everlasting life [John 6:27], and the result is discontentment. Empty complaints are heard about unemployment. Is then the activity which is commanded by Jesus “Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness” [Matt. 6:33] so burdensome, so grievous, that there is reason to be averse to it? On the contrary! Never has anyone who was busy in this work complained about it. The most outstanding God-fearing people have found inexpressible satisfaction in it. Not...

Continue reading