All Articles For Vol 83 Issue 03 11/1/2006

Results 1 to 10 of 12

Mr. Wigger is a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hudsonville, Michigan. Congregation Activities Once again this fall the men of Bethel PRC in Roselle, IL were given the opportunity to be part of a Men’s Book Reading Group. Their agenda for the year called for quarterly meetings at Bethel, usually on a Saturday morning. For their October meeting, the men planned to discuss the first 123 pages of The Christian in Complete Armour, by William Gurnal, where the reader is warned of the reality of Satan and the saints’ call to arms. Starting October 4, Rev. J. Mahtani, pastor...

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Mr. Kalsbeek is a teacher in Covenant Christian High School and a member of Hope Protestant Reformed Church, Walker, Michigan. Previous article in this series: October 1, 2006, p. 13. “And the children of Issachar, which were men that had understanding of the times, to know what Israel ought to do; the heads of them were two hundred; and all their brethren were at their commandment.” I Chronicles 12:32   The One Power that Will Conquer Islam  Regardless of the outcome of the present conflict between Islam and the West, even the death of the West would not result in...

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Rev. Kleyn is pastor of First Protestant Reformed Church in Holland, Michigan. Previous article in this series: September 1, 2006, p. 471. The element of worship that we now consider in this series of articles is congregational singing. The Scriptures make plain that this is a required part of worship. Especially two New Testament texts point this out. The first is Ephesians 5:19, which admonishes the church as follows: “Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord.” The other text isColossians 3:16, which says much the same thing. Singing...

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Reprinted from When Thou Sittest In Thine House, by Abraham Kuyper, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, Michigan.1929. Used by permission of Eerdmans Publishing Co. Discipline  Wrong must be rebuked, but in that rebuke itself new wrong, even sin, is possible when it is administered from an unholy motive or in an unrighteous, unpsychological way. With a judge at court this is not so evident, because he is bound by penal law, must take in consideration all sorts of forms, and passes verdict mostly long after the wrong has been committed. But at home with wife and children and...

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Precious Drops Wrought of water’s face O’er by Spirit moved Hung in early space Precious drops of Dew In a mist descend Mingled with the sweat Adam’s brow portends ‘Til the garden’s Wet With the latter mist Kissed upon free slaves Sign of sins dismissed Midst the Red Sea Waves Rolling as the Flood Wrenching from His brow Voluntary blood Messiah’s work is Now Cleansing hearts corrupt Seen in dew-soft rain Drop by drop by drop Sprinkled in His name —Connie L. Meyer

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Prof. Hanko is professor emeritus of Church History and New Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary.   Introduction  Although the modern Pentecostal movement is of fairly recent origin, the heresy that the movement promotes has ancient precedents. Solomon uses as his theme in Ecclesiastes the saying, “There is nothing new under the sun.” This truth applies also to Pentecostalism. In the early church the error of Montanism arose, which, while not in all respects like today’s error, was nonetheless a predecessor of Pentecostalism. The Montanists were followed by mystical sects of all sorts that appeared throughout the entire Middle Ages,...

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Rev. Kuiper is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church in Randolph, Wisconsin. Previous article in this series: September 1, 2006, p. 473. In our last article we examined ways in which Reformed diaconates today can implement, and often are implementing, the care of non-poor Christians, such as the sick, aged, widowed, handicapped, and the like. In this article I particularly address Protestant Reformed diaconates, suggesting another way in which deacons can busy themselves in their work. The suggestion regards establishing a group of small retirement homes that are intended primarily for the benefit of Protestant Reformed people, and are overseen...

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Rev. Hanko is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Lynden, Washington. Previous article in this series: September 15, 2006, p. 495.   The Third Disputation: Chapter 2:10-16 (continued)  16. For the LORD, the God of Israel, saith that he hateth putting away: for one covereth violence with his garments, saith the LORD of hosts: therefore take heed to your spirit, that ye deal not treacherously. The attempts to deny the plain teaching of this verse are legion. One commentator lists four basic interpretations, three of which turn the passage on its head: (1) that it concerns only pagan worship...

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The Protestant Reformed Seminary began its eighty-third year of instruction of men for the ministry of the word and sacraments on August 28. Prof. David Engelsma opened the school year for the faculty and students with a chapel-speech on I Samuel 17:38-40 entitled, “Unsuitable Armor.” Seven men are full-time students. Mr. Nathan Langerak, son of the Hope Protestant Reformed Church in Walker, Michigan, is a fourth-year student. He is married to Carrie. They have two children. Nathan is presently doing his internship at the Grandville Protestant Reformed Church in Grandville, Michigan. He will finish his training with courses at the seminary the...

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Rev. Van Baren is a minister emeritus in the Protestant Reformed Churches. “Young, Restless, Reformed”  In Christianity Today, September 2006, an interesting article was printed with the above title. It appears, according to the article, that there is growing interest among young people and in some seminaries, both with students and professors, in the Reformed doctrines. These are seeking something more substantial than the fluff offered so often today to please the young. The article claims a growing conviction of many that the Reformed doctrine is concerned centrally with the glory of God and not entertainment for man. The writer begins...

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