All Articles For Vol 62 Issue 17 6/1/1986

Results 1 to 10 of 11

David Harbach is a teacher at Adams St. Prot. Ref. Christian School, Grand Rapids, Michigan. In March of this year, Rev. den Hartog received a Rev. and Mrs. J. Klamer into his home. Rev. Klamer is a missionary of the Dutch Reformed Church (Liberated) in Holland. What was interesting to Rev. den Hartog was how Rev. Klamer had dealt with some of the same questions we have faced in Singapore, such as the questions of the place of our Confessions in the work of missions and the principles of doing mission work. Rev. Klamer labored in Indonesia for ten years...

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QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE BIBLE, by E.W. Johnson; Sovereign Grace Publishers (Pine Bluff, Arkansas), 1984,; 103 pp., $3.69 (paper). (Reviewed by Prof. H. Hanko) The author of this book is the pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. It is perhaps best to let the author himself state the main theme of the book: May I repeat the theme of this study? I am not basing the canon of the Bible, of the Old Testament or the New, on historical evidences. The canon of the Bible must be found in that logical deduction which the child of faith...

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Arie den Hartog a missionary of the Protestant Reformed Churches, is currently laboring in Singapore. A life of self denial, this is the absolute requirement for those who would be the disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ. In our last article we considered something of what is involved in true self denial. Self denial is something quite different from merely denying to ourselves certain legitimate pleasures and pursuits on this earth. It is not the monk who lives a life of asceticism, poverty, and deprivation and self-inflicted torture that practices true self denial. In doing all of these things he...

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Thomas C. Miersma is pastor of the First Protestant Reformed Church, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. We have been considering the principle laid down in Scripture and taught us also by the reformers, that Scripture is its own interpreter. Thus far we have focused our attention upon the words and phrases of Scripture and upon doing what are called word studies. The purpose of such study is to listen carefully to the text of Scripture and to submit our understanding to the Word of God. This is also true of the study of the grammar of the text. The word grammar may...

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James D. Slopsema is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Randolph, Wisconsin. Infant Baptism (2) In our previous article on infant baptism we saw from the baptism form that whereas our children are without their knowledge partakers of the condemnation in Adam, so also are they without their knowledge received unto grace in Christ. This truth is evident from the fact that God establishes His covenant of grace with believers and their seed. This the baptism form demonstrates by calling our attention to Genesis 17:7 andActs 2:39. Having laid down this very important truth, the baptism form proceeds to call our...

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Ronald H. Hanko is pastor of Trinity Protestant Reformed Church, Houston, Texas. We have seen again and again in the first six Commandments of the Law that the Ten Commandments are an enduring revelation of the will of God for our lives, not only because they are given by an unchanging God, but because they themselves reveal the eternal glory of God. Each Commandment is rooted and grounded in one or more of the virtues and attributes of God Himself. The Law is not, therefore, first of all some kind of social or political instrument for the improvement of society,...

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Gise J. Van Baren is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hudsonville, Michigan. Preparing Alice for bed at night came to be quite a routine. First, there were the prescribed exercises. Each finger and toe, the arms and legs, all must be moved the proper number of times. These exercises, too, were not to develop muscle strength, but rather were to stretch muscles enough to prevent or minimize painful cramps. Then, thick socks were put on Alice’s feet after lotion had been soothingly applied to her legs. Next, each arm and leg had to be placed in a position...

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Robert D. Decker is professor of New Testament and Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Evangelism is Reformed The Rev. Robert Grossmann, Associate Professor of Ministerial Studies at Mid-America Reformed Seminary, Orange City, Iowa wrote an excellent article under this title in the April 1986 issue of Mid-America Messenger. In our times there is much emphasis on the Social Gospel, Arminianism has made alarmingly deep inroads into Reformed Churches, and theological liberalism has all but won the day, Grossmann contends, and rightly so, that only the truly Reformed can do evangelism biblically and effectively. We quote the article in its...

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Herman C. Hanko is professor of Church History and New Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Last time we considered the significance of the doctrine of Scripture concerning Christ in our discussion of what is meant by person. Because Christ was like us in all things, an analogy is present between this truth and the truth concerning any child conceived in the womb of its mother. That a child is born is a great wonder, and is surely beyond our understanding. But the fact nevertheless remains that not just simply a body is formed in the womb of its mother,...

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Cornelius Hanko is an emeritus minister in the Protestant Reformed Churches. Ques. 105 What doth God require in the sixth commandment? Ans. That neither in thoughts, nor words, nor gestures, much less in deeds, I dishonor, hate, wound, or kill my neighbor, by myself or by another; but that I lay aside all desire of revenge: also that I hurt not myself, nor willfully expose myself to any danger. Wherefore also the magistrate is armed with the sword, to prevent murder. Ques. 106 But this commandment seems only to speak of murder? Ans. In forbidding murder, God teaches us, that...

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