All Articles For Vol 55 Issue 11 3/1/1979

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CHRIST AND HIS CHURCH IN THE BOOK OF PSALMS, by Andrew A. Bonar; Kregel Publications, 1978; 457 pp., $12.95. (Reviewed by Prof. H. Hanko)  This book is one of Kregel’s classic reprints and a part of the Kregel Limited Edition Library. The author was an Eighteenth Century minister in the Free Church of Scotland. He has prepared this short explanation of the 150 Psalms. 

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“Tobacco Is…” There is an old Methodist ditty (I think it must have been “Methodist”) that went something like this: “Tobacco is a filthy weed, and from the devil doth proceed; it stains your hands and bums your clothes, and makes a smokestack of your nose.” One could always get a good laugh from that—especially when quoted to good Calvinists who all knew how the fathers puffed away at the old Synod of Dordt. Of a Methodist one could expect such sort of odd ideas. But a good Calvinist and his tobacco could seldom be parted.

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“not. . . in the same manner”  Two more recent arguments against reprobation raised in the Reformed churches today are of greater concern. The first is an argument based on the phrase in the “Conclusion” of the Canons of. Dordt, “in the same manner.” The entire sentence reads: “The Reformed Churches not only do not acknowledge but even detest with their whole soul . . .

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True godly fear is that fear of God that causes a man to reverence the Lord with holy awe and to worship Him in humble adoration. Godly fear is the profound spiritual attitude that dominates the heart and soul of the child of God who is conscious that he lives in the presence of the sovereign, majestic, infinitely glorious, almighty, perfectly holy God. The godly man knows he is under the solemn obligation to serve and live for this God. This God the god-fearing man desires with all his earnest longing to obey and to please. Godly fear stands in...

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This is the second letter that Paul wrote to the church at Corinth. The first epistle was written from Ephesus while Paul labored there on his third missionary journey. He had heard from the congregation of Corinth by means of a letter brought to him personally by members of the church. They had need of counsel, and his first letter contained the message which the Spirit would speak unto the church. It naturally concerned many problems in the church. It was written in warm pastoral counsel accompanied by urgent warnings to correct evil. 

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