All Articles For Vol 47 Issue 08 1/15/1971

Results 1 to 10 of 13

Question  Dear Brother:  Very frequently one hears from our pulpits statements concerning our abode in glory and our relationship and recognition concerning the saints and/or Biblical characters.  The question is this: To what degree and in what capacity will they be recognized? Will it be their role, station, or spiritual influence or contribution which they had or made during their earthly pilgrimage? I sometimes get that impression. If so, why is this just limited to Bible characters?  Thank-you. 

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II. Our Distinctive Training  Now, surely, our training of these covenant young people requires of us that we set an example of that covenant distinctiveness in our own lives. The chain-smoking coach is not going to get across to his athletes that smoking is going to hurt them by giving them shortness of breath and by robbing them of stamina. And when father or mother goes along a little bit in the ways of the world, father and mother point out the way their teenagers will go.

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Calling attention to the history of doctrine, particularly of the doctrine of the atonement during the third period, 730-1517 A.D., we mentioned Anselm of Canterbury, and quoted from Philip Schaff in his History of the Christian Church as this historian gives a brief review of the life of this esteemed Schoolman.  Rev. H. Hoeksema writes concerning Anselm the following in his notes on the history of doctrine:

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The other of the two main purposes for establishing Christian schools was, as Luther put it, welfare of the “temporal estate.” Christian schools did not only have importance for the spiritual realm” of the reading of the Bible, the preparation of ministers, and the general training of children to live and work properly in the Church. They also had to serve the purpose of enabling the children to live and work as responsible Christians in the various spheres of temporal, earthly life.

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ELECTION: 1. Its Origin (concluded) In the previous article we noted that the origin of election is the sovereign will of God. This is important, since it will keep us from the error of seeking any root of election in man. Having only in this way the proper perspective of the truth, we will see that election is not to be conceived of as made on the basis of foreseen faith (Canons I, 9). What possible good is there to foresee, in the spiritually dead and totally depraved sinner?

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Recently we reported to you the decisions of the Synod of Sneek-Lunteren of the Gereformeerde Kerken concerning doctrinal matters. In connection therewith, we stressed the critical nature of the situation in the Netherlands at this time; and we expressed the wish that there would be those who would have the courage and the strength to take a clear-cut stand and to exercise the right and duty of reformation.  Thus far, however, there is little indication of the latter. 

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