All Articles For Vol 44 Issue 20 9/1/1968

Results 1 to 10 of 12

Candidate Richard Moore accepted the call he had received from our church in Isabel, South Dakota, providing that congregation with its first minister since their organization. Rev. Lubbers, of Southwest Church, declined the call he was considering, which he had received from Hull, Iowa. South Holland has named another trio, consisting of the Revs. C. Hanko, M. Schipper and G. VanBaren.

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THE GREAT LIGHT, Luther and Reformation; by James Atkinson; Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1968; 287 pp., $4.00.  This is Volume IV in the series on Church History entitled “The Advance of Christianity Through The Centuries.” The series is edited by Prof. F.F. Bruce. This volume, as its title indicates, deals with the Reformation, including the reformation in Germany, Switzerland, England and Scotland. 

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And David arose, and went with all the people that were with him from Baale of Judah, to bring up from thence the ark of God, whose name is called by the name of the LORD of hosts, that dwelleth between the cherubims. . . .  And they brought in the ark of the LORD, and set it in his place, in the midst of the tabernacle that David had pitched for it: and David offered burnt offerings and peace offerings before the LORD. 

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It is both stimulating and heart warming for members of the Mission Committee to observe how important the work of missions in our churches really is. This comes to the foreground annually at the time of Synod when the work done in the past year is discussed and evaluated and new mandates are given with a view to future labors. Much time was spent at Synod in considering this calling which we have. Many lively discussions concentrated upon our work and what must be done.

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Rev. H.C. Hoeksema Editor of The Standard Bearer  Dear Brother in Christ:  As a true Calvinist committed to our Reformed faith, I am deeply disturbed by what happened at the 1968 Synod of the Christian Reformed Church meeting at Grand Rapids, Michigan this June. Its decisions were characterized by (1) increased compromise on doctrinal defection; and (2) increased ecumenical and social involvement.  In the area of doctrinal defection there was a refusal to make doctrinal pronouncements and the following overtures were denied: 

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The proposed plan of union between the Reformed Church in America and the Presbyterian Church in the United States (Southern Presbyterian) is a rather lengthy doctrine of some 97 pages. For those interested, this plan of union in booklet form is available in Presbyterian or Reformed Church Book Stores for 25. I would point out in this and subsequent articles various features in this proposed union which certainly could not be acceptable to any truly Reformed man. There are those in the Reformed Church in America who also firmly believe this.

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Modern liberal religion is a philosophy of ethics and morality. In fact, liberal interpretation makes ethics and morals of central importance in the shade of which stands religion, faith and practice. The biblical and theological religion of redemption is reduced to a social ethic, with Jesus Christ the paragon of ethicists. Not the saving power of God, but the spiritual competence of man is the important element in the modern gospel. It propagates a social gospel which concerns itself with the ethical problems of the present life. God and the world to come are matters of personal opinion.

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It was, according to all reports, a drab and colorless meeting. There was little new, little that had not been said before and probably said better, little advance in the cause of world-wide ecumenicity. There would be little point in reporting on it except that The World Council of Churches has become an issue within the churches of the Reformed tradition. At present the Gereformeerde Kerken in the Netherlands have decided that, while they will not join for the present, there is no real reason why they cannot join.

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