All Articles For Vol 42 Issue 02 10/15/1965

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The process and proposals of merger are rather interesting to observe—particularly when these take place in denominations which have, historically, close ties with our own. That is especially true today for us as we observe the developments taking place in the Reformed Church of America. And, of course, it is ever easiest for those on the sidelines to make remarks, suggestions, and criticisms. Yet for our own consideration and instruction, there are certain remarks which must be made.  REACTION TO THE PROPOSED MERGER 

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THE REFORMATION: Vol. III in “The Pelican History Of The Church”; by Owen Chadwick; published by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company; 445 pp. $5.95.  This new series on the history of the church is written by six different authors, Owen Chadwick, the author of this volume, the general editor. He is Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Master of Selwyn College. 

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And the men did so; and took two milch kine, and tied them to the cart, and shut up their calves at home: And they laid the ark of the LORD upon the cart, and the coffer with the mice of gold and the images of their emerods, And the kine took the straight way to the way of Bethshemesh, and went along the highway, lowing as they went, and turned not aside to the right hand or to the left; and the lords of the Philistines went after them unto the border of Bethshemesh. 

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Open Letter To Evangelicals by Dr. R.E.O. White, published by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, Michigan.  This book is of merit for anyone interested in the deep and ultimate ground of Christian hope, joy and certainty of faith, notwithstanding its limitation that its author does not sound the depths of faith’s certainty in the rock-bed of God’s elective love and sovereign predestination, but is satisfied by simply showing that we need more than shallow emotionalism, that we need a faith revealing itself in fruits of faith. 

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The term Agnosticism, probably invented by T. Huxley (1869), is used to express the philosophy that no knowledge of absolute reality is possible. It holds that man can not have any real, valid knowledge, but can know only phenomena (Kant), or only impressions (Hume). Certain half-agnostics, denying theoretically all objective truth did nevertheless practically speak of a rough approximation to what we might loosely and colloquially call “truth” under some such designation as “value judgments” (Ritschl).

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