All Articles For Vol 28 Issue 16 5/15/1952

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Arminianism is a subtle heresy. Let us see how true this is by attending to its teachings regarding justification by faith. My quotation is from the “Elements of Divinity” by Thomas N. Ralston, D.D., an avowed Arminian, who wrote in the latter part of the 17th century. From this work we quote the fol­lowing from chapter XXXI: “Justification—False Theories Refuted—Justification by Works Alone, and by Faith and Works United, Considered.

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How sad they imagined their plight to be is indic­ated by their weeping. But they were not starving they were well-nourished men, strong and vigorous and in the best of health. For the manna, to which they were restricted, was a perfect food. Thus what they cried for is not nourishment, they had that, but the pleasures of the table, sensuous enjoyment, for they cried for leeks and onions and cucumbers and mel­ons and garlic and above all for flesh; in a word, they cried for the fleshpots of Egypt.

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There is really nothing so painful under the sun as to see brethren and sisters in the Lord live in disunity of mind and soul; it is the pain of the breaking of the harmony of the music of the love of Christ in the unity of the Spirit and the bond of peace. Conversely it is also true, that nothing gives such joy as to see that brethren dwell together in the unity of brotherhood. It is like the precious ointment wherewith Aaron and his sons were anointed; it is like the dew of Mount Hermon upon the top...

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At the conclusion of our previous article we promis­ed to continue our discussion on the subject of solving the problem of obtaining teachers qualified to teach in our Protestant Reformed schools by suggesting cer­tain stop-gap or emergency measures which should be taken as long as we lack the regular facilities to train our own teachers. To this task we now address ourselves.

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That, in my conviction, is the question that con­fronts our Protestant Reformed Churches today. Shall we remain Protestant Reformed which, to me, is the same as Reformed; or shall we open our church doors to the Liberated and their doctrine which, as I am more and more convinced, is not Re­formed at ah? This is a very serious question. It is also a very real question.

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