All Articles For Vol 22 Issue 17 6/1/1946

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Marriage, Heaven-Made or Not. In an attempt to adjust its marriage canons to the existing conditions, and thus, to “take a more realistic approach to the subject of re-marriage”, Bishop J. Davis of the P. E. Church wants to decide the validity of marriages, at least of those that prove unhappy and unsuccessful, on the basis of the question whether it we a heaven-made marriage or not. How fertile are men’s minds. Eureka. (How simple that really was. Here we have been groping about for a solution to the knotty problem of marriage and the re-marriage of divorced people, and...

Continue reading

“In whom also ye, having heard the Word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, in whom also (in which (gospel) also) having believed ye were sealed. . . . by the Holy Spirit of Promise unto the redemption of the (final) possession, unto the praise of His glory?” Ephesians 1:13, 14 That the “sealing” of which the Bible speaks must not be conceived of as being realized in a mechanical way, nor in such a way as to render man a “mere stock and block” became evident, we trust, in our former writing. This act of the God of...

Continue reading

Johnny was naughty again today. The rod had to be taken down from the place where it is kept, and Johnny felt its sting. Johnny walked away crying, and only too often, with nothing less than an increased degree of fear for his father or mother. His fear of the Lord had not increased at all. What is wrong with the above description of Johnny’s experience with the rod? Surely we are not advocating the sparing of the rock The fear of the Lord is never taught that wav, “Spare the rod and spoil the child.” The Lord Himself declared...

Continue reading

Having called Samuel and revealed to him the doom of Eli’s house, “the Lord appeared again in Shiloh,” so we read, “for the Lord revealed himself to Samuel in Shiloh by the word of the Lord.” As was pointed out, this statement closes the third chapter. The narrative continues at chapter 4:1 as follows, “And the word of Samuel came to all Israel. . . A It is evident, as already has been observed, that here the narrative flows on in unbroken continuity. The word of Samuel that came to all Israel of chapter 4:1 is the revelation of the...

Continue reading

As was explained in former articles, already in the time of the apostles many Jews and pagans became Christians in name only and thus clung to their old beliefs and practices, which they smuggled into the church, where they matured and eventually became known as Ebionism and Gnosticism. The Ebionists and the Gnostics were the heretics in the Christian church of the first five centuries. The Ebion and Gnostic teachers and their followers were wolves in sheep’s clothing. Their presence in the church bespeaks the attempt of the evil one to Judanize and paganize the church by the propagation of...

Continue reading

Chapter 4: The Final Judgment. (cont.) Tins also implies that the final judgment will take place through the Spirit of Christ, This already follows from the fact that all the works of God are of the Father, through the Son, and in or by the Spirit,. And if the judgment is to be accomplished by Christ, as the visible Representative of the invisible God, it must be the Spirit of Christ through whom the verdict is bound undeniably upon the consciences of men. Besides, thus the Scriptures teach us directly. Even now, the Comforter, the Spirit of truth, whom Christ...

Continue reading

The New Modernism, by Dr. C. Van Til. Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company, 525 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. March 1946. Price $3.75. This is not a book for the general reeling public. But to those that are interested in the study of the Theology of Chrisis, we recommend the reading of this work by Dr. Van Til. It can hardly be meant as an introduction to the Barthian Theology, for the book rather presupposes a measure of acquaintance with Barthian conceptions and terminology; and, besides, this criticism of Barth should itself be read critically, i.e. the reader should be able...

Continue reading