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All Articles For Vol 21 Issue 02 10/15/1944

Results 1 to 7 of 7

The Rev. S. Cammenga, pres. of the last Classis opened the session. The roll-call revealed every congregation to be represented with two delegates, ex­cept Redlands and Manhattan, with one each. Rev. P. De Boer took the chair and Rev. S. Cammenga kept the minutes for this session of Classis. The minutes of the last meeting were read and their recording approved. The church visitors for the Calif. churches report that they have done their work and their report on the visit is accepted. The Classical Comm. also renders its report. Then came the report of the Sermon Com­mittee, that is,...

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* Speech delivered at the Annual meeting of the R.F.P.A. on Thursday evening, September 14, 1944 in Fuller Ave. Comments and criticisms concerning any of the material here presented is invited. Tonight we celebrate twenty years of continuous publication of the Standard Bearer. I thought it appropriate, therefore, on this twentieth anniversary, to depart somewhat from the usual type of speech heard on the occasion of the Annual business meeting and to review briefly the past twenty years of history of the Standard Bearer. To accomplish this resume of the past twenty years many facts have been gathered and some conclusions...

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* Paper read at a meeting of the student philosophy club of the Protestant Reformed Seminary. But as Kant points out the arguments of Anselm and Descarte, as well as those of Leibniz, are based upon assumptions which have yet to be proved. One assumption is: That existence must be regarded as one of the qualities in of the concept of an absolutely perfect Being. And a second assumption in Descarte’s argument is that matters of existence, in this instance at least, can be discovered by a purely analytical examination of conceptions that are clear and distinct, without recourse to...

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What do we mean when we speak of “public opinion?” Consulting the dictionary one finds that an opinion is: “A conclusion or judgment held with confidence, but falling short of positive knowledge.— Favorable judgment or estimation.—An opinion is a general conclusion held as probable, though without full certainty. —A conviction is a fixed opinion sustained by such evidences as removes all doubt from the believer’s mind.” From the foregoing it is plain that the word “conviction” is stronger than the word “opinion.” The word “opinion” from the Latin opinio means think. When one expresses his opinion about something, he states...

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To get our bearing in expatiating on the history of Israel—on that part of it in which the person of Jephthah figured so prominently—we must reach back a few years to the times that immediately followed the death of Gideon. So soon as Gideon died, the children of Israel turned again, and went a whoring after Balaam, and made Baal-covenant their god. The amazing foolishness of the people! It had been demonstrated to them, through the achievements of Gideon’s faith, that, national freedom, security, and prosperity lay only in the way of obedience and wholehearted consecration to Jehovah in opposition...

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Chapter 6: The One Sacrifice The moral theory of the suffering of Christ stands condemned, first of all, in the light of all that Scripture teaches us concerning the state and condition of the natural man, and the character of sin. For, according to Scripture, sin is guilt, and the sinner is liable to punishment, worthy of damnation, wholly unworthy of God’s favor, a child of wrath. Sin is not only, and not in the first place, an inherent weakness or defilement of the human nature, some moral imperfection that may be removed by the influence of some sound moral...

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We received the following communication: Dear Mr. Editor, We were astonished to read on page 470 of the Standard Bearer of September 1, 1944, what Mr. Richard Tempelman had written to you in a personal letter. He undoubtedly did not intend it for publication. And, Mr. Editor, we were mystified also by your action. What did you hope to gain by the publication of that letter, without having tried to verify its contents? Surely it could serve no good purpose. As to the contents of the letter: we will answer the charges. We particularly resent the attack upon the Convention...

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