Vol 18 Issue 09

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Contribution

This is not to run ahead of our Mission Board, dear reader, this is to discuss what we should do, now that our missionary, Rev. B. Kok, has accepted the call to Hudsonville, Michigan. God has blessed the labors of our missionary. Wherever he worked he was faithful in proclaiming the Word of God. Two flourishing congregations have been added to our churches. Must we call another missionary? Must we have a stronger radio station? Must we have a nationwide hook-up? Must we spread more literature? God has given us a high calling in this good land which He has...

The Government and Social Questions

The social structure is an exceedingly complex one,—complex as life itself. In fact, the question of society is that of human life itself with all its numerous relationships. For man, by virtue of his creation, is a social being, like unto Him Who formed him from the dust of the ground. God, three Persons in unity of divine essence, is a social God and His life is a social life. That is precisely what is meant when we think of God as a “covenant” God. In the image of that God and after His likeness man was created. Thus man...

Melanchthon and the Reformation

Melanchthon’s acceptance of an appointment as professor of Greek in the University of Wittenberg—an appointment tendered him by the elector of Saxony—may be regarded as that act of his through which he joined himself to the movement of the Reformation. It took place in 1518, the year following Luther’s writing and publication of his 95 theses. Melanchthon, feeling the spell of Luther’s large personality and spiritual depth, seems to have been prepared on his first arrival at Wittenberg to accept the new theology—new to the church of that day—which as yet existed mainly as a living spiritual force in the...

On Sunday Labor for Defense

Those that are able to read Dutch may omit this editorial, for it contains in the main a reproduction of what I wrote in the previous issue of our paper on the same subject. The reason for this reproduction is a request. Many, and, perhaps, they are chiefly found among those that are most directly concerned with this problem, cannot read the Holland language. And the request, therefore, is very reasonable, one, in fact, which I may not ignore and cannot refuse. All the more gladly do I follow up this request, because in personal discussions it became evident, as...

2/1/1942