All Articles For Vol 17 Issue 21 9/1/1941

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The people of Israel were encamped at Kadesh. The period of the forty years had drawn to a close, so that the time for the host of the Lord to take possession of the promised land was at hand. Two routes lay open to them: the one direct through the land of the Edomites, the other long and circuitous, stretching around and eastward of Edom. Accordingly Moses sent the king of Edom a message, petitioning him to allow the people of Israel to pass through his land. The message was friendly and warm. The first part of it declared by...

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South Holland, IL July 15, 1941 The Rev. H. J. Kuiper, Editor, The Banner Dear Sir: When Luther and Calvin saw that their Roman Catholic Church had lost the TRUTH of the Scriptures, they began to instruct their brethren, within said church regarding the unscriptural ecclesiastical errors, with the result that the Roman Catholic Church cast them out and persecuted them. The above is a historical fact which neither you nor anyone who has studied history dare deny. Now, it so happens that in our time, the Christian Reformed Church in America, of which you are a pastor, and I...

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Dear Editor: Just before the warm weather arrived, we organized in our midst a Protestant Reformed Christian School Society. I had the privilege to attend all the three meetings that were held. The membership of the society is well over one hundred and twenty five, representing the First Protestant Reformed Church, Roosevelt Park Church, Creston Church and Hope Church. A board of seven men was elected: the Messrs. Zwak (Creston); Piper (Roosevelt Park); J. Kuiper (Hope); D. Monsma, A. Haan, J. Piersma, S. Bylsma (all of the First Prot. Ref. Church). To this board two more men are to be added...

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My sincere apology to the Rev. H. De Wolf for my failure to assign to him a share of the work in the proposed outlines for the Standard Bearer of 1941-1942. I do not know how to explain the omission, except that, as I always emphasized in school: “nihil humanum alienum est mihil” and “errare est humanum.” Rev. De Wolf will, of course, gladly believe of me that the omission was not intentional. It was just a bad blunder on my part. But it can easily be corrected. Looking over the outlines, I noticed that the Rev. L. Doezema was...

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LORD’S DAY 1 Question 1. What is thy only comfort in life and death? Answer. That I, with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Savior Jesus Christ; who, with His precious blood, hath fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me that without the will of my heavenly Father not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation; and therefore, by his Holy Spirit, he also assures me...

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In a striking way our Lord closes the so-called Sermon on the Mount. These words are part of the application of this Sermon. Strange as it may seem, some people, who care little concerning religion, and who scoff at the infallibility of the Word of God, claim to be in harmony with the Sermon on the Mount—especially the Beatitudes. Strange, because they seem to understand the meaning of the contents of the Words spoken by our Lord. They find them fitting in connection with present day conditions. Besides, the Lord Himself spoke these Words. And so, while the Epistles of...

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We have in this psalm the cry of the merciful. It is the cry of the merciful man in trouble. And he knows that he will be delivered. The first verse is the main theme: Blessed is he that considereth the poor: the Lord will deliver him in the time of trouble. The writer is David. David in trouble, but trusting in God. First, we find a description of the blessedness of a merciful man; second, we hear of the trouble of the merciful; and third, we listen to his pitiful plea, which is at the same time a testimony...

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By the morale of an army is meant the mental attitude of the soldiers toward their position and service and all that is connected with it: their courage, their willingness to serve, their zeal and enthusiasm for the cause in which they serve. According to reports the morale of the American Army so far as it was drafted in recent months, that is being trained in the various camps all over the country, is very bad. So the papers reported. And the report may be considered corroborated by the fact that it was considered necessary for the Secretary of War...

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