All Articles For Vol 17 Issue 18 6/15/1941

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In my last article under the above caption I showed that, in the language of Rev. Steigenga, “for many the tithe is an easy, cheap and arbitrary way of serving God with their abundance, and for many others it is it is unfair and difficult in the extreme.” It is very difficult, I wrote, for the father of a large family, with an income much too small, to give the tenths. Such a man should not tithe, as through his doing so he would be taking the bread out of his children’s mouths. For this man to tithe would be...

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As was said, It was a hard speech that the people uttered against the Lord, at their hearing of the report of the spies. They wanted to know why He had brought them to the border of Canaan that they, their wives and their children, should be a prey. The people were committing a great sin. In the Lord’s own words, they were despising and rejecting Him in His faithfulness and veracity, His longsuffering and mercy, holiness and righteousness. They did so, not in their ignorance but deliberately, knowingly. For these virtues of God were manifest in them and were...

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Before I continue my narrative, I want to tell you something. On the eve of my departure from Manhattan, after my last lecture, a group of young folks, with smiling faces, and bubbling over with young life, took me to task for what I had written last year in our paper about the weather in Manhattan and the Montana climate, and they dared me to write anything derogatory on that delicate subject this time. It is my experience that in many States people talk about their weather and climate as if they made it themselves. Well, the above mentioned young...

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At the time when our synod was held and when, therefore, as many of the editors of the Standard Bearer were in Grand Rapids as could ever be expected, the president of the staff, the Rev. G. M. Ophoff, called a meeting of the editorial staff for the purpose of discussing the desirability of changing the setup of our paper and introducing possible improvements. The meeting was held on May 26, in the consistory room of the First Protestant Reformed Church of Grand Rapids. Present were the editors, the Revs. G. M. Ophoff, G. Vos and the undersigned; the associate...

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In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestinated according to the purpose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will. That we should be to the praise of his glory, who first trusted in Christ. Eph. 1:11, 12 We! Notice the use of the first person throughout, Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ; according as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame...

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There is a vivid contrast in this psalm. On the one hand, we read a description of the wicked in their wanton wickedness; and, on the other hand, a description of God’s wonders, both in the works of nature and of grace. The first verse has given rise to many different explanations and even translations. One, the able linguist, Delitzsch, translates the first verse as follows: “An oracle of transgression hath the ungodly within his heart: There is no fear of God before his eyes.” But the fact remains that in the original Hebrew the expression is: my heart and...

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Philosophy, Education, and Certainty, by Robert L. Cooke, Ed. D., Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan. This book has already been much discussed also in Reformed circles, and has met with unstinted praise and recommendation. The reason for this is to be found in the subject, the aim the author kept before his mind in treating the subject, and the way he treats it. The author proposes to expose the failure of philosophy to supply us with a firm basis for the education of our children and youth, and defends the proposition that only the principles of the gospel of...

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