All Articles For Vol 15 Issue 19 7/1/1939

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Strange words these. Peculiar admonition. I would not brethren that ye should be ignorant concerning the great event of the passing through the Red Sea. Moreover, I would not that ye should be ignorant. In this clause we find the conception with the preceding chapter. The exhortation at the end of the chapter pictures a sharp contrast between the athletes in the Olympic stadium and those who run the spiritual race. There is first of all similarity between them. The contestants strove for the reward or the crown which was to be had when the race was finished. The difference...

Continue reading

In the foregoing article on the typology of Scrip­ture, we were occupied with the Holiest Place and its furniture. As the symbolical import and typical bear­ings of this furniture can be fully comprehended only in connection with the service of the day of atonement, we shall consider this service, the instructions for which are contained in the 16th chapter of the book of Leviticus. This chapter has exclusive regard to the means of approach to God on the day of atonement. It consists of two portions. The first of these (vs. 2-28) contains the directions for the annual atonement; and...

Continue reading

The prophetic activities of Hosea occurred in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah. The contemporary kings of Israel were: Jero­boam II; Zachariah, the son of Jeroboam and the last king of the house of Jehu; Shallum, Menahem, Pekahiah, Bekah and Hoshea, the last king of Israel. The joint reign of these kings lasted from 823 to 730 B. C. Altogether comprising a period of 93 years. All these ‘kings were wicked (of Israel). Of each one it is related that he walked in the ways of Jeroboam I. The period during which Hosea prophesied was...

Continue reading

A Commentary on Galatians by Martin Luther. Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Mich. Price $1.95. This is a new and very much abridged translation of the well-known commentary of Martin Luther on the epistle to the Galatians, by Theodore Graebner, professor of Philosophy and New Testament Interpre­tation at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri. In the preface the author writes: “The undertaking, which seemed so attractive when viewed as a literary task, proved a most difficult one, and at times became oppressive. The Letter to the Galatians consists of six short chapters. Luther’s commentary fills seven hundred and thirty octavo pages...

Continue reading