All Articles For Vol 15 Issue 07 1/1/1939

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It has been several months since the readers of the Standard Bearer have heard concerning our labors in Manhattan, Montana. First of all we may say that we have labored here these several months with great joy and may believe that the Lord has also here given us an open door. Every week we are privileged to preach the Word to a fair and attentive audience of about 70 to 75 individuals. Many, who have become more and more convinced of our sincere desire to lead them into the truth of God’s sovereign grace, as interpreted by our Reformed Standards,...

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The Rev. A. H. Bratt, Manhattan, Montana. Esteemed Brother: For the cause of God and truth I hereby come to you with the following simple yet important question; How dare you, in the light of the fact that you so frequently emphasize the absolute sovereignty of God Whose purposes never fail, subscribe to the following statement of the Professor Berkhof in his pamphlet on the ‘Three Points,’ as you did before me and your consistory. “[DUTCH REMOVED]” pp. 27, 28. If this is not a denial of God’s Sovereignty then I can not understand plain Holland language, and yet you...

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In regard to the atonement of Christ our Reformed theology, in distinction from all others, maintains that it is particular. This doctrine of Particular Atonement as being thoroughly Scriptural is beautifully enunciated in one of our Reformed Standards, n.l., the Canons of Dordt, over against the teachings of Arminianism. The latter teaches, as is well known, that Christ’s death is intended for all men without exception, that is, that Christ died for all individuals. Hence, the name of this doctrine, General Atonement (in the Dutch, Algemeene Verzoening). This doctrine not only belittles the righteousness of God but also ultimately denies...

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In the previous article under the above caption the false view of Job’s critics was exposed and examined. These critics maintain that without exception every wicked and thus reprobated personage receives in this life his full measure of punishment—a punishment that consists in just the kind of calamity and pain that has overtaken Job. So, beholding Job’s sufferings, they reproach him with atrocious sins, and thus indirectly declare that, being a wicked man, a lion of iniquity, Job has God against him and therefore now perishes as do all the wicked. As was made plain, these friends, through their reasonings,...

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A contradiction in words. Does not the one exclude the other? Misery and joy are not the one and the same. A man in the midst of misery knows of no joy and we do better not to ask him, when he finds himself in the midst of all kinds of trouble, whether he enjoys his condition. Or is it wise to ask that same man if he cannot conceive of the idea, that after his misery he may expect days of joy? The world will not be comforted with such thoughts. In our day we find trouble on every...

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