All Articles For Vol 14 Issue 22 9/15/1938

Results 1 to 7 of 7

But now, O Lord, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we are all the work of thy hand. Isaiah 64:8 A plea! But now, O Lord! There is another side to our case, Thy side, the divine, the eternal, the unchangeable side, the aspect that concerns Thy faithfulness, and the glory of Thy name! Hitherto we presented our side. And considering all that is with us, there can be no hope. All is dark, and there is no prospect of light, even of the faintest glimmer; all is worthy of condemnation and there...

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To a layman’s mind there occur still a few more facts that must be taken into consideration if we would explain the present economic situation. They concern particularly the modern industrial system. The first of these facts is the vast and extremely speedy production of commodities that are thrown on the market for consumption. How conditions have changed in this respect! I remember the days that it paid to make everything by hand. Even though there already existed the large factory with its machine-driven production, there was still room for the small shop. Working days were usually rather long. Wages...

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When we speak of science as contrary to faith, we would not leave the impression that they exclude one another, that there is an essential distinction between the two. This is emphatically untrue. To the contrary, true science and faith embrace one another, so that the one is possible only through the other. We speak of science vs. faith only because this is a common conception today. A believer and a scientist are regarded as opposites. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the scientists of today can hardly be considered believers. Faith, then, is the acceptance of that...

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When God created us He set us in the very midst of all the works of His hands and bade us to serve Him withal. We stand today too in the midst of creation. Turn which way we will, we always have to assume an attitude toward the things of God’s hands. That attitude admits of two extremes. The one attitude is that of non-using of creation. Men consider it sin to use creation. Men practice world-flight. With the monks of yore and the Anabaptists of today they see creation as belonging to the lower and baser order of things...

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The foregoing article on this subject was an explanation in regard to what the sin offering begot for those in respect to whose sin or sins it was brought. We now turn to the ritual of this offering and first to that part of it that had to do with the choice of victims. The matter of what might be offered has already been examined. It appeared that not any animal might be taken, that, to make the gap between the offerer and the victim as small as possible, the selection was limited to the herds and flocks and to...

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“Prayer Ruts” is the caption of an editorial appearing in The Banner for September 1, 1938. The writing is from the pen of the Editor-in-Chief and reads in part as follows, “We ministers of the gospel must confess that we have not always been mindful of the injunction of the apostle Paul in Timothy 2:1, 2: ‘I exhort, therefore, first of all, that supplications prayers, intercessions, thanksgiving, be made for all men, for kings and all that are in high places; that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and gravity.’ The phrase ‘first of all’...

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In the Rev. Vermeer’s article “News From Our Western Churches,” there was a misrepresentation concerning our newest congregation at Edgerton in its relation to the Christian school. I refer to the following sentence: “And before I finish in Edgerton, let me add that this congregation is 100 percent for the Christian school, and that nearly half of the school board at present are members of the Prot. Ref. Church.’ Neither of these statements are true to fact. As far as I know, there are but two members of the present school board that are members of our church, and even...

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