Contributions

Tucson, Arizona

June 12, 1960

Editor of the SB

Rev. Herman Hoeksema  

Dear Sir:

Written in the June 1, 1960 issue of The Standard Bearer under the title “All Around Us” is an article by the Rev. M. Schipper. It deals with economics as does another article by the same author which appeared in the Jan. 1, 1960 issue of The Standard Bearer entitled “Drug Price Investigation.” I read these articles with interest since I enjoy studying economics as a sort of hobby. Especially at this time our national economy seems to be at a crisis. We are all faced with the problem of creeping inflation, mounting taxes and the problem of full employment. Since the Rev. M. Schipper has taken the initiative in the discussion of economics it might be well to go a little further and see if Scripture has anything to say on these problems. I wonder if the Rev. M. Schipper could write a few articles in The Standard Bearer answering a few questions I would like to have answered.

Is the Christian to confine himself to merely spiritual matters or is he also concerned with material matters. If I may explain in a little more detail, would it be wrong for him to attempt in accordance with God’s will to remove poverty, promote peace, overcome disease, improve educa­tion, etc. Or should he take the attitude, this is not our permanent home. I’m simply passing thru, therefore I need not concern myself with the material things of this life. Should a Christian confine himself to only discussing spiritual things, to the exclusion of all else.

Now I do not believe that we are to seek first this present world, nor do I believe this world will ever gradually improve until it reaches perfection, neither do I believe that God is dependent upon us to accomplish his purposes, but I would still like to know if it would be wrong for a Christian to attempt to remove poverty, promote peace, overcome dis­ease, improve education, etc. in accordance with God’s will?

We have Christian Doctors, Christian Educators, Chris­tian Hospitals, Christian Psychiatrists and we have even had a Christian Prime Minister, Abraham Kuyper, why not Christian Economists?

When Christian doctors seek to re-establish health in the sick brother, when a Christian school teacher seeks to im­prove education, when a Christian Philanthropist donates gifts to the needy brethren, is this wrong? Does he by these actions become materialistic and humanistic? Is it possible for these people to do all these works of charity and still place the Kingdom of God first?

Would the Reverend please answer?

An interested reader, just a layman,

VERNON GRAESER

P.S. Concerning “Moral Rearmament” I am in the main in agreement with M.S.