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All Articles For II Samuel

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Leaving David and his followers to refresh them­selves in the plain of Jordan, let us return to Jeru­salem and observe the progress of the rebellion there. In the meantime, Absalom with Ahithophel and the whole band of his adherents had removed from Hebron to the holy city. Coming to him, Hushai with feigned enthusiasm and with considerable gusto, it may be imagined, uttered his greeting: May the king live! May the king live!

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Mahanaim (II Samuel 17:27) The people of the region where David and his fol­lowers were now encamped were friendly. Knowing that he and his people must be in a condition of ex­treme want for the necessities of life, they came to him in Mahanaim with an abundance of provisions. The sacred writer names three of these benefactors. With obvious delight he describes in detail their gen­erosity toward David.

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As was said, “the man’s” words were cutting. All that Joab could manage in the way of reply was that he would not thus tarry with “the man” wasting time in useless argument. Absalom in the meantime might escape by himself or some of the people with as lit­tle courage as “this man” might release him from the tree and deliver him up to David alive. Unable to understand David’s attitude, he was determined to see to it that Absalom did not leave that forest alive.

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So had the Lord destroyed the opposition and de­livered His servant. The danger of his perishing by the sword of his enemies had thus been removed. How­ever, there is yet another aspect of the salvation that was sent him that must not be overlooked. In the words of Ahimaaz, the priest (II Sam. 18:19), the Lord had judged him from the hands of his enemies. This is a side to the gracious working of God in behalf of His servant that must be seen.

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The sacred writer now takes us again to Mahanaim across the Jordan, the sight of David’s encampment. The city had an outer and inner gate with a roof sup­porting an upper chamber. On the roof was a watch­man on the outlook for messengers. For the day was well spent, so that reports on the battle could be com­ing in at any time now. David was seated in the space between the two gates below. Here he may have been sitting all the day long waiting for this hour. For it was the same place in which he had part­ed from...

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Absalom was dead, slain in battle. The remnant of his army, called “Israel” in the text, fled every man to his tent. The king tarried in Mahanaim, the sight of his encampment during the final stages of the re­bellion. He could have returned and reoccupied his throne by force and even reeked terrible vengeance upon all the leaders of the revolt. But he was not just another oriental despot but a true shepherd king of God’s people, humble, compassionate and forgiving. For much had been forgiven him. So he was decided to wait until recalled by the people.

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Now Absalom had commanded his servants, saying Mark ye now when Amnon’s heart is merry with wine, and when I say unto you Smite Amnon; then kill him, fear not: have not I commanded you? be courageous, and be valiant.  And the servants of Absalom did unto Amnon as Absalom had commanded. . . .  But Absalom fled and went to Talmai, the son of Ammihud, king of Geshur. And David mourned for his son every day. 

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2012, p. 182. To the postmillennial hope of the perfecting of the victory of the Messianic kingdom within history, with the exception (as of the present) of the destruction of death, Reformed amillennialism objects that Scripture and the Reformed confessions promise the perfecting of the victory of the Messianic kingdom, and the perfecting of the kingdom itself, at the second coming of Christ. The Goal of History The full victory of the kingdom of Christ does not occur within history, as part of the historical process, but is rather the goal of history—history’s...

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