All Articles For Deuteronomy

Results 121 to 129 of 129

The position of the Hebrew Christians in the world was very precarious; they are surrounded by cruel foes, not the least of their own country-men. They have need of patience, that, after they have done the will of God, they may receive the promise. They are pilgrims and strangers in the world as were their patriarchal fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. And it was needful that they walk in faith as the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.

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Approximately 120 miles north of Seattle, a mere three miles from the United States-Canada border, and only thirteen miles from Pacific waters, lies the peaceful little village of Lynden, Washington, Here, through the missionary labors of Rev. A. Cammenga in the late 1940’s, God rekindled a love for the pure, historic Reformed faith. The result of those labors, under God’s gracious blessing, was the establishment of the Lynden Protestant Reformed Church in 1951. 

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For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children:  That the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born; who should arise and declare them to their children:  That they might set their hope in God, and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments.  Psalm 78:5-7

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This is a subject which has been much discussed in recent Reformed theology in connection with the doctrine of predestination and especially in connection with the doctrine of reprobation. Appeal has been made by some theologians to the fact that this expression, eodem modo, is rejected in the Conclusion of the Canons of Dordrecht in order to modify—in fact, to change radically—the doctrine of reprobation as taught and confessed in the first chapter of the Canons.

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We have been viewing the progress of the study committee, called the “Joint Committee of 24,” as it has been working in the past years towards a goal of eventual merger of the Reformed Church in America and the Presbyterian Church U.S. (Southern). Last time I called attention to their reports to their respective highest assemblies in 1963 and in 1964. This time I would present the report of this same committee to the General Synod and the General Assembly this past spring.

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