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All Articles For Vos, Gerrit

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The superscription of this psalm and song tells us that it was occasioned by the dedication of the house. There we must put the period. What follows tells us who the author of the psalm and song is, namely, David. Many expositors tell us that this song was composed by David unto the dedication of the temple. As such it was prophetical, that is, it reached forward to the time when Solomon would really and actually do what David here does in prospect. As Spurgeon puts it: “Glory to Thee for all the grace, I have not tasted yet!” We...

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The superscription of this psalm tells us at what occasion it was composed. It was when David changed his behavior before the face of Abimelech, the king of Gath. The record of this history you will find in I Sam. 21. The events recorded there date from the period when David had to flee continually before the face of Saul. At one such occasion David hurried to the country of the Philistines, more particularly, to the people of the city of Gath. Its king was named Achish. Now you will note that in Psalm 34 the name of this king...

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There is a vivid contrast in this psalm. On the one hand, we read a description of the wicked in their wanton wickedness; and, on the other hand, a description of God’s wonders, both in the works of nature and of grace. The first verse has given rise to many different explanations and even translations. One, the able linguist, Delitzsch, translates the first verse as follows: “An oracle of transgression hath the ungodly within his heart: There is no fear of God before his eyes.” But the fact remains that in the original Hebrew the expression is: my heart and...

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After reading Psalm 38 and noting that David calls this psalm: “to bring to remembrance”, we are inclined to say: the sooner forgotten the better. It seems to me that nice people would rather not have too much of this song. Its language is shocking to the so-called refined intellect. The choice of words is rather indelicate. Imagine: my wounds stink! Who wants to use this kind of language to describe self? Much more: who would want to sing it? Have you noted, dear reader, that you will never find a number in the host of hymn-books which comes anywhere...

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We have in this psalm the cry of the merciful. It is the cry of the merciful man in trouble. And he knows that he will be delivered. The first verse is the main theme: Blessed is he that considereth the poor: the Lord will deliver him in the time of trouble. The writer is David. David in trouble, but trusting in God. First, we find a description of the blessedness of a merciful man; second, we hear of the trouble of the merciful; and third, we listen to his pitiful plea, which is at the same time a testimony...

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Gerrit Vos (1894-1968) was a minister in the Protestant Reformed Churches and long-time contributor to the SB. This wonderful article was first published as a meditation in the June 15, 1948 issue of the SB (vol. 24, no. 18, pp. 409-411). “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: and I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish; neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father’s hand. I...

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* Speech delivered at the recently held convention of our young People’s Societies in Grand Rapids, Mich. For quite a while I have known the main theme of this convention, namely, Christian Liberty; but I confess that I have had no little difficulty in finding a sub-head under this general theme. One of your committee members, in charge of this convention, suggested I speak in Christian Liberty and Amusements. For a while I thought seriously on this subject, but for more than one reason, I did not go through with it, chiefly, because the subject did not appeal to me...

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Having called Samuel and revealed to him the doom of Eli’s house, “the Lord appeared again in Shiloh,” so we read, “for the Lord revealed himself to Samuel in Shiloh by the word of the Lord.” As was pointed out, this statement closes the third chapter. The narrative continues at chapter 4:1 as follows, “And the word of Samuel came to all Israel. . . A It is evident, as already has been observed, that here the narrative flows on in unbroken continuity. The word of Samuel that came to all Israel of chapter 4:1 is the revelation of the...

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We presume that all our readers are acquainted with the fact that the ministers of the Protestant Reformed Churches and the ministers of the Reformed Church in the U. S. have had several conferences in years past. The fact of this matter has been advertised repeatedly. The members of both churches have also contributed financially for this worthy venture. The last Conference was held at Hull, Iowa, and the conference for this year will be held at Sutton, Nebr. The undersigned brethren have been appointed by the 1946 conference to take care of matters for the 1947 Conference. And at...

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The second article of the Rev. Doekes appeared in De Reformatie of July 5, 1947, which article our editor wants me to publish, together with my translation. The article reads as follows: (DUTCH REMOVED) Here follows the translation: Unto Whom Is The Promise? (Reply to the Rev. Hoeksema) The promises of God have been the occasion for much strife, already for ages. An important cause of this must be sought in the “confusion of tongues” which time and again is brought to light in such struggles. The results of Babel are, indeed, conquered “in principle” by the Spirit of Pentecost,...

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