All Articles For Vos, Gerrit

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There is a difference between prayer and supplication. Prayer is that activity of faith whereby you turn your soul to God as the Fountain of all good things, thirsting for Him and very desirous to be filled by Him with all the good things you need for time and eternity. Supplication is all that, but it is prayer colored by your distresses, woes, miseries. Also herein that you turn yourself tempestuously toward Him. If I was writing in the Holland language I would say: supplication is that “ge Hem aanloopt als een waterstroom”! Well, the latter you find in this...

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There is perhaps no imagery quite so vivid in its speech as the language of water. It is a figure that is often employed by the Holy Ghost in the Holy Scriptures. Both in the Old and the New Testament we note its speech. One of the very first Psalms that we learn in our earliest infancy is the beautiful 42nd psalm with its central theme of the thirst for streams of living water. But also in other portions of the Old Testament do we find its language. Think, for instance, of Isa. 44:3: “For I will pour water upon...

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Yes, there is also such a thing as denominational wisdom. (First italics mine; second the Rev. G. Hoeksema’s. See The Banner, April 27, 1939, page 391.) And I would add the softly spoken wish: would that you promoted and followed it with a view to the matter in question. Wisdom, divine wisdom, is the choosing of the best means and the best ways to arrive at the most wonderful end, namely, the glorification of the Triune God who is blessed forever! This wisdom does not consist in returning to the “precious calm” as the above-mentioned minister of Christ puts it....

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Jesus had begun His ministry. We cannot be very certain as to the exact happenings before the events took place that are given in Mark 1, but so much is sure, He had filled His days with many labors. And all these labors left Jesus very tired indeed. They were grievous labors. All of them: His baptism, temptation, miracles, preaching reminded Him of the terrible journey to hell. It is as the prophet Isaiah said so many years before: “As many were astonied at Thee; His visage was so marred more than any man, and His form more than the...

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The eleventh Psalm is Davidic; the superscription tells us so. But when we inquire after the time of its composition and the circumstances referred to in the Psalm we cannot come to absolute certainty. There are those, among whom the learned Deitzsch, who think that the circumstances described in this Psalm refer to the perilous time of Absalom’s conspiracy to grasp the reins of government. In support of their exegesis they point to the third verse that speaks of foundations which are being destroyed and point out that this refers to the foundations of government and further that only during...

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“The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: He leadeth me beside the still waters.” Psalm 23:1, 2. There is a poet of olden times who has called the twenty-third Psalm the nightingale of the psaltery. I can well believe it. It is of a homely feather and shyly it sings out of obscurity. Among the large bundle of Psalms it sings to us in few words, but, oh how sweet they are. It has given solace and rest, comfort and courage to a veritable host of God’s children. It...

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Psalm 42:1, 2: “To the chief musician Masehil, for the sons of Korah. As the heart panteth after the waterbrooks, so panteth my soul after Thee, o God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?” The Bible, beloved, is full of sharp contrasts. And one of them comes to our mind when we read the superscription of this most wonderful Psalm. We read that David composed this Psalm for the use of the sons of Korah. Now the name Korah reminds us of that other history where many men and...

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There are many difficulties confronting us when we set ourselves to write something about this Psalm, difficulties of a various nature, exegetical, historical, theological. A man could write a rather long treatise about the difficulties alone. Try to write something about this Psalm, restricting yourself to this theme: What did David suffer when he wrote here as he did? For instance, whatever could have happened to David when he complains: “They have pierced my hands and feet”? Or this: “they part my garments among them, and cast lots upon my vesture”? Yes, we meet all kinds of difficulties here. The...

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We do not know at what occasion this song was composed. That is, we do know in general, but not in particular. It may fit several occasions. It may very well point to the ascension of the ark of the covenant into the hill of Zion at the time David fetched it from the house of Obed-Edom. And again: it may refer us to one of the occasions when David returned from the battle with the selfsame ark after successfully slaying the enemies of the Lord. We do not know at what particular occasion this psalm was composed, but we...

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Now that is a foolish thing to do. Whatever or whomever you may attack, never attack innocence. You lose before you start. Whatever you do to virtue returns upon your head a million times over. Because virtue is God. Yet such was the case with David. David was innocent; still he was attacked. And his attackers lost their case. You cannot really harm virtue. We do not know tine historical background of this gem. It may have been the time when David had to flee from the face of Absalom, his son. It would fit this case admirably. Note the...

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