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All Articles For Vanden, Berg G

Results 71 to 80 of 266

During the early years of the present century, the struggle continued unabated over the question, “Who has jurisdiction in the calling and sending of the missionary?” The debate revolved about the theory of“centralization” (synod and classes may exercise this right) versus the theory of “decentralization” (this right belongs only to consistories): Our readers will recall that the Mission Orders adopted in 1898 and 1902 both stood definitely on the basis of centralization but that against that position various protests were registered so that the matter was constantly broug

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Perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of the work of family visiting is the selection of the proper and most effective method. On the one hand, careful attention must be given that there is some definite system and order followed in this work with a view to attaining its spiritual objective. Unless this is done, the work, haphazardly done, will prove to be fruitless. On the other hand, however, the same caution must be taken to avoid making this work a matter of formal routine.

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The teaching of Presbyterianism is regarding the Church and State is found in the original Westminster Confession of Faith, Chapter 23, entitled, “Of the Civil Magistrate.” It reads as follows: “I. God, the supreme Lord and King of all the world hath ordained civil magistrates to be under him over the people, for His own glory, and the publick good; and, to this end, hath armed them with the power of the sword, for the defence and encouragement of them that are good, and for the punishment of evil doers.

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“In places where the consistory is to be constituted for the first time or anew, this shall not take place except with the advice of the classis.”  Decisions pertaining to this article. “The customary usage for the organization of a new congregation is as follows:  1. A letter of request is directed to the classis or mission committee, expressing the desire to organize a congregation in a certain named locality, and signed by the heads of families or by adult single persons who live in that locality. 

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“Four kinds of ecclesiastical assemblies shall be maintained: the consistory, the classis, (the particular synod), and the general synod.”  Article 29, D.K.O. In this article the second of four major sections of the church order is introduced. This part, comprising Articles 29-52 inclusive, deals with the various ecclesiastical assemblies. This section may be further subdivided as follows:  Articles 29-36 treat the general principles and regulations which concern our ecclesiastical assemblies; 

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The main principle of Article 37 of the Church Order we have discussed in our last article. This.concerned the question whether or not the deacons are part of the consistory. The Church Order definitely favors the view that the consistory is composed only of ministers and elders. To this the deacons may be added by special regulation and then only when the consistory is small in number. Others, however, include all the officebearers of the church in the consistory and then make distinction in the labors to be performed according to the nature of the special offices.

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