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All Articles For Vanden, Berg G

Results 171 to 180 of 266

One more reason that is often advanced to support the contention that ecclesiastical censure cannot be applied to those who neglect their calling to use the facilities of Protestant Reformed education where these are made available is the claim that the task of the training of the children is a parental responsibility and, therefore, parents are at liberty to choose the school that they desire for their children. Where they send them is of no concern to anyone else and the responsibility for that decision rests alone on the parents. The church has no right to interfere with this liberty. The point...

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Assisting the Poor The committee of the Christian Reformed Church that some years ago drew up a proposed revision of the church order saw fit to exclude altogether from this revision the matter of Article 83 of our church order. The reader will recall that this article deals with the matter of the deacons providing assistance to the poor who, for sufficient reason, see fit to remove from the congregation. The deacons are to provide according to their discretion an amount that is adequate to enable these poor to reach their new place of residence.

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(Each synod shall be at liberty to solicit and hold correspondence with its neighboring synod or synods in such manner as they shall judge most conducive to general edification.) ― D.K.O. Article 48  The parentheses surrounding the above article indicate that it, like the preceding article, applies to particular synods and, therefore, the matter with which it deals is of no direct concern to us since we have only a General Synod. 

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Clearly the eighty-fourth article of the Church Order is designed to counter the many and serious evils of the hierarchical or collegialistic forms of church government. According to this system, a federation of churches is not considered to be a union of several self-governing churches; but each church is regarded as a sub-division of a big super church that is ruled from the top down. At the top is the Pope whose word is law. At the bottom is the local church which is coerced into submission to the will of the Pope.

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Error in doctrine and offensive conduct are set forth in Article 72 of the Church Order as the two evils that necessitate ecclesiastical discipline. This has been the Reformed position since the days of the Reformation. Various synodical decisions of the past bear this out. The Wezelian Convention of Reformed Churches in 1568 decided “that one who advocated strange teachings and heresies, secretly or publicly, should be disciplined (Chap. VIII, 7), and also that one who led an evil life should be censured (Chap. VIII, 9).” The first regular Synod, Emden, 1571, maintained these two causes for discipline (Art. 26)....

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“These articles, relating to the lawful order of the church, have been so drafted and adopted by common consent, that they (if the profit of the churches demand otherwise) may and ought to be altered, augmented or diminished. However, no particular congregation, classis (or synod), shall be at liberty to do so, but they shall show all diligence in observing them, until it be otherwise ordained by the general synod.”  —Article 86 D.K.O. 

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“Secret sins of which the sinner repents, after being admonished by one person in private or in the presence of two or three witnesses, shall not be laid before the consistory.” Art. 73, D.K.O. “If any one, having been admonished in love concerning a secret sin by two or three persons, does not give heed, or otherwise has committed a public sin, the matter shall be reported to the consistory.” Art. 74, D.K.O. It will be evident that Articles 73 and 74 of the Church Order, quoted above, are closely related. They both deal with the manner in which the...

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